A Year in a Day

0

Reviewer: Yamilenu Bamgboye

Release Date: Dec 3, 2017

Platform: Libratv

 

The first modern Nigerian movie that unconsciously, maybe, adopted the three unities of drama: the unity of place, time and action as postulated by Aristotle is The Wedding Party 1 and 2. I can say that I’m glad to see another movie do the same. However, I’m of the view that the cornucopia of a screenplay should be felt in the central message regardless of its length, the simplicity or complexity of its characterization.I love uniqueness, I love creativity especially if it is simple, classy and all together extends beyond the usual. I guess that explains why I got glued in the first place.

A Year in a Day, is a one hour thirty-seven seconds feature film that portrays the ‘dereliction of matrimonial duties’ or the sexual inadequacies of a husband toward his wife through three characters only. It’s written by Daniel Oladele, directed by Aleshi Sanni and features Mofe Duncan, Kenny George and Aleshi Sanni himself.

The play opens with a prologue that gives as much insight as needed into the ‘bruhaha’ that later leads us all the way to the peak and then resolution. Although it’s laced with a number of grammatical ‘skuskus’ (even with the epilogue) loooolz, the twist that comes with that technique douses whatever negative opinion one must have formed along the line. Additionally, I wouldn’t withhold giving due accolades to the clean shots. Mehn, the cinematography is awesome!! For me, I think that can stand shoulder high with big or high budget movies like October 1, 30 Days in Atlanta and the rest.

It’s also thumbs up to Daniel Oladele, the writer. It’s true that the story portrays everyday issues; marital, especially but Daniel’s use of ‘extensive imagination’ to forecast a tragic end by heightening the interest of his audience to continually think that a sexual relationship between Bisoye and Tobiloba, Toyeshe’s younger brother has begun is quite intriguing. All that notwithstanding, the lesson learnt is that a woman who’s sexually starved, if not disciplined and patient enough to straighten things out with her husband, can go to any length to satisfy her desires with anyone, regardless of the age difference.

Have you ever seen a movie that doesn’t have a flaw? Maybe not yet. The few things I can attribute to flaws here include Bisoye’s night robe costume which she wears from dawn to dusk and time wasting used as ‘scene fillers’.

We aren’t new to code-mixing in Yoruba movies. In fact, it’s been in existence since the modernisation of our local languages. However, this code-mixing thing given an elevated ‘branding’ in Kunle Afolayan’s October 1 probably to reflect the true nature of things in those days: the language of communication in government, the clear-cut difference between the educated and the uneducated, the negative and positive Western influence on young people and the wake of socio-political evolvement in Nigeria, has become a growing trend of a sort. Today, it’s not surprising to hear the title of a play sound English like Open Walls, The Love of Our Lives,The Wedding Ring etc. and still hear Yoruba dominate.

But can one stop wondering what such movies really tend to achieve with that? For A Year in Day, I still can’t place my hands on the idea behind that except the relationship the title shares with the three unities of drama: unity of place, time and action.

Click to watch.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here