The Brand of Cain, Episode 17

By Larry Sun   Richard found the door of his mother’s house unlocked and fear gripped him for an instant; he opened and got into the...

CupidsRisk, Episode 11

  13: A man should provide for his Family...Myne + Aeedeeaee “What are you doing here!?” Iphey screamed. “Please let me come in, I have to talk...

The Brand of Cain, Episode 20

  By Larry Sun The sun was fighting its final descent beyond the war zone when Eze Chima opened his eyes. The last orange rays were...

The Brand of Cain, Episode 15

By Larry Sun     She hesitated a moment before she untied her night dress and let it slip to the floor from her shoulders. Jamal smiled and...

The Brand of Cain, Episode 21

“No, you’re not; you’ll soon be, I assure you, old pal.” He turned to Richard. “Can we go now?” The gatekeeper shook his head slowly...

The Brand of Cain, Episode 29

By Larry Sun “I was not being a vigilante, that is one job I detest. I was returning from the minaret. Brother Daniel can testify to that, he saw me holding my Qur’an when I came to call him. That day was on a Saturday and I went to Tajjud vigil the night before, which was on a Friday.” “Now, I want you to answer this question truthfully.” “That I killed him? I have told you, I am not—” “Will you stop flapping your flatulent mouth and let me finish?” Lot roared angrily. The boy became mute.  “When you saw the body, did you come across any weapon—any gun?” Hakeem shook his head. “Are you sure?” He nodded, beads of sweat had begun to form on his nose. “Before seeing the body, did you meet anybody on your way?”  He spoke up this time, “I met many people, most of them were returning from church, but I did not see anybody when I turned into this street. The street was as quiet as a Shehu’s grave.” “What about when you were going to Daniel’s, did you meet anybody?” “I met nobody, but I felt the spirit of the dead man following behind me. It made me burst into a run with fear.” “Okay, thank you, but before you go, how old are you exactly?” “I will be fifteen by November twenty-eighth.” “What’s your full name?” “My name is Ciroma Hakeem Musa and I am not a terrorist.” The reply surprised the detective, “Who says you are?” Hakeem spread his hands, “That is the idea. Most people believe every Muslim is a terrorist.” “Then you’re a devout Muslim, right?” “A faithful believer in Allah and Prophet Mohammed, salla Allah alaihi wa sallam. I have never gone on a pilgrimage to Mecca, but I pray to Allah five times daily and I do not eat pork.” “Are you from the North?” “I am precisely a Fulani but my parents work here in Lagos. My mother sells Tuwo Shinkafa at the car-park and my father imports cattle from Kaduna to sell here in Lagos.” “You’re a very smart and intelligent boy, I like you.” The boy’s face brightened up like a Christmas light in a dark alley, “SubhanAllah. Allah be exalted.” Lot smiled, “I want you to pray to your Allah or Mohammed to give us the wisdom to catch the murderer. Will you do that for us, please?” “Detective Abdullot and Brother Abduldaniel, have faith in the Qur’an, first paragraph, book four.” “Care to tell us what it says, Imam Musa?” Daniel asked. “The feasts were brought among the unbelieving infidels and no longer were they unbelieving.” The boy quoted. “You see, all you need is faith and Allah will help you.” “Do your parents know how intelligent you are, Hakeem?” Daniel said to Hakeem, the boy’s foibles he had always been finding charming. Hakeem shrugged, “I doubt it, my father spends more time with his cattle than with me and my mother is always flirting with cab-drivers at the park. They are both illiterates, of course.” “Thank you, Hakeem,” Lot said, “You can go now.” He pressed the ‘Stop’ button on the recorder. The boy rose and bowed to the two men, and then he walked out like someone who had just rescued a drowning dog in the presence of an impressed crowd. Lot turned to Daniel and asked, “What do you think?” Daniel smiled, “That boy is funny and intelligent. He’s definitely one of those boys who do not mind exchanging banters with anybody they come across. And he speaks English almost perfectly. I mean he never uses contractions. Never ‘I’m’ or ‘you’re’ but always ‘I am’ or ‘you are’.” “I know what contractions are,” Lot snapped at him, “Was he lying when he was explaining how he came across the body?” “If that boy was lying, you would have known, sir. He spoke everything he knew.” A bee buzzed past them and banged its face against the wall. “The gun was taken away by the murderer.” Though Lot spoke out, he actually spoke to himself. “Mr. Martins might have committed suicide.” Lot cast a sharp annoyed look at Daniel and said, “Have I got to tell you thirty-six times, and then again thirty-six that he was murdered? Where were you when the Almighty passed out brains?” “I’m sorry, sir. Who are we questioning this time?” “The gatekeeper, of course.” Lot answered. “Wait a minute, Hakeem said the gatekeeper was already awake when you knocked on the gate, was that true?” “It seemed so.” “Then he might have seen or heard something.” “Or he might know how the body reached the gate.”                                     FOURTEEN The name ‘Eze’ meant ‘King’ to Chima, and he always acknowledged himself as a person of royal status, though he was a gatekeeper most of his life and had not even a chieftaincy lineage. He was dressed in his native Igbo attire; a red cap rested smugly on his head and a pair of black pointed shoes covered his feet. He sat on a chair as he entered the interrogation room. Detective Lot watched him closely and coughed. He picked up the recorder and pressed the rewind button for a second or two, then he pressed the ‘Record’ button and began: “What is your name, sir?” said Lot, calling upon all his powers of self-control to force the last of these five words through the barrier of his teeth. He believed Chima was an older man who deserved no much of a respect from him. “John Eze Chima.” “Can you please tell us about yourself, Mr. Chima?” “I have nothing much to tell; I’m an easy-going man and I don’t cause trouble.” Eze said flatly. “Is that all you’re going to say?” “What else do you want me to say? I’m in perpendicular a man who doesn’t speak much about himself.” Lot leaned back in his chair and looked at the old man opposite him intently. He could only see a calm but dangerous expression in the man’s eyes. “Sir, how old are you?” Lot asked. “I can’t remember, but I celebrated my eleventh birthday when Nigeria got her independence.” Lot made a swift calculation in his mind, “Then you’re sixty years old.” “Thou hast said.” The detective slapped his forehead and groaned, the man was succeeding in getting on his nerves, he suppressed his anger. It was like gulping a mouthful of bile. “How long have you been working for the deceased?” The old man lapsed into memory, “About half a decade now, I think.” “Your relationship with the deceased, was it what one could call amiable, as in friendly?” Eze chuckled, rivers of wrinkles flowing down the corners of his eyes and mouth. “That’s quite on the contrary. No one had a friendly relationship with Cain, except his lawyer, of course.” “Now that he’s gone, do you miss him?” “No, I don’t. I mourn his death though, but not the closing of his big mouth. He was as cruel and headstrong as an allegory on the banks of Nile. Nobody would miss a man who had visited the pearly gates with a CV that would make Saint Peter call for the celestial security guards to bundle him straight to hell.” The detective shifted in his seat to a more comfortable position. “Mr. Chima, let’s talk about that gun you possess. How did you come about the old rifle?” “It’s my war souvenir.” “Excuse me?” “Biafra,” Eze said, pausing to scratch his groin.”It was in the late sixties when I was still young and handsome,” he laughed, “I was about eighteen or nineteen years old when the war broke out. I was picked to join the army against my wish, then I was given an oversized uniform with a gun and sent to the warfront to face death—there was no shooting training performed, no combatant training, nothing. Yet, I killed about six dozen enemies with that gun, can you believe that? The more I killed, the braver I became. It was a sheer miracle that I was not killed in that war, I didn’t even sustain a scratch. Many of my colleagues, older and younger, were unlucky and got killed, some got their limbs blown away, some bodies could not even be identified because they were silly enough to face killing tanks with pistols and hunters’ guns.” He smiled as a remembrance occurred to him. “There was time during the war when we were suddenly attacked with tanks, it was just like God’s attack on Sodom and Glocca Morra from the pages of the Old Tentacle, as brave as I was, I immediately turned and ran like hell, dripping with inspiration. I wasn’t turning chicken, and I wasn’t trying to be a superman either, I was just using my head for once. Those who fight and run away live to fight another day. So I ran, a bullet richshawed a tree and almost hit me in the head. There are times when you don’t need a priest to tell you that it isn’t sensible to take on a tank with your gun, because if you do, you’ll be standing there holding your gun and looking at the hole the tank just created in your belly. I think that was what really happened in the case of some of my silly mates. “After the war, I kept my gun as a souvenir; its sight will always remind me of my youth, the days when men were still men.” He smiled, “I don’t think you can reprehend the meaning of what I’m saying.” After listening patiently to the gatekeeper’s tale, Lot asked, “Have you ever shot the gun after the war?” “Yes, twice. I shot a bullet in 1988 and another in about a decade and a half later.” “What war were you fighting then?” “No be war. I shoot the bullets up to the heavens because of the sound, it makes the memories of the Biafra fresh in my brain.” “Did you shoot any recently?” “No.” “Mr. Chima, do you have a family, any wife or child?” “I lost my wife in 1992, she died of tuberculosis and Chidi, my only son, died in 2002. He was one of the victims of that bomb explosion at the cantonment. My daughter, too, died at childbirth.” “Accept my condolence, sir.” Lot said dryly. Chima smiled, “Many years ago, I would have appreciated your sympathy, but now, Amaka, Angela and Chidi are nothing but old memories to me.” “We are investigating the death of Mr. Martins and I believe you are going to help us on the case. You are going to help, right?” “Sure, why not? If he was killed, then the person who did it has done many people a great favour, yet, he shouldn’t have taken the law in his own hands. If I may say, I don’t even believe Cain was killed.” “Can you please recount to me what happened on the night of the seventh?” The old man began to speak his words in orderly sequence as if he had composed the speech on paper, then memorized and possibly rehearsed it. “It was about ten-thirty in the night when I heard the sound of a car engine,” he began, “I went to the garage and saw Cain and the driver in a jeep, of all the cars in the garage, Cain had always preferred to go out in a jeep.” “Where were they going?” “I have no idea, nobody told me. Cain only ordered me to open the gate, which I obediently did; he was my boss.” “And the next morning Cain was found dead?” “No, something else happened before that.” “What happened?” “At exactly half past twelve that night, Oga drove back inside alone.” Daniel, who had been silently listening to the two men was surprised, “Are you sure about that, sir?” “Positive,” replied Eze Chima, “Cain came back that night without the driver. When I opened the gate and saw only Cain in the jeep I immediately sensed that something fishy was going on—honestly, I thought Cain had killed Richard and dumped his body somewhere before coming back. You see, Cain and his driver were like cat and mouse, so the thought that Cain had killed Richard was not really a surprising one to me. What really baffled me was seeing Cain lying dead outside, because I locked the gate from within when Cain drove back inside, and I put the keys under my pillow. Nobody could have taken it without my knowledge.” “Maybe there were the duplicates of the keys.” Lot said.

The Brand of Cain

    By Larry Sun Episode 13 Then he decided to let them live, he did not feel like killing anything anymore at that particular moment. He had...

The meaning of life is to find your gift. The purpose of life is to give it away.

Powered by : Get It Right With Shittu

Click to get more motivational quotes

Trending

Speak No Evil: A Novel Unveils in Style

A Nigerian author in the UK, Uzodinma Iweala has shown the world the official photograph (s) of his much anticipated novel Speak No Evil: A Novel due for release in March 2018. The novel dwells on the story of Niru, a Nigerian teenager whose sexual orientation differs from all and the fallout with his family when his father finds out he is gay. The book is coming twelve years after the author published his bestselling debut, Beast of No Nation According to Brittle Paper, the unveiling of these photographs shows us all that publicity for the new book is underway and that the first set of reviews should follow soon enough with announcements of book signing events. Source: Brittle Paper

Of the love tango between Toke Makinwa and Festus Fadeyi, her daddyfriend

(From a mystic perspective) By Yusuf Balogun Gemini. email: yusufbalo15@gmail.com 'We invented marriage. Couples invented marriage. We also invented divorce, mind you. And we invented infidelity, too, as well as romantic misery. In fact, we invented the whole sloppy mess of love and intimacy and aversion and euphoria and failure. But most importantly of all, most subversively of all, most stubbornly of all, we invented privacy', Elizabeth Gilbert. Controversies have surrounded Toke Makinwa, an actress and an award winning multi-media personality whose past is traceable to a messy divorce she had with her husband, Maje Ayida after he impregnated Anita Solomon. The infidel's life lived by Maje had led to this inevitable separation and one of the main triggers of Toke's best selling book--On Becoming. Funny enough, her life had been peacefully led afterwards until the recent 'rumour' that she is having an affair with Dr. Festus A. Fadeyi who is in his 70s. This new boyfriend or daddyfriend of hers is the billionaire chairman and managing director of Pan Ocean Oil Nigeria limited. It was claimed that he took loans to fund his firm's oil and gas upstream project operated under joint operating agreements and production sharing contracts with and on behalf of the Nigerian National Petroleum Company (NNPC) and is allegedly indebted to Skye bank to the tune of 196 billion naira. This simple revelation has triggered the pointing of fingers (by Fadeyi’s children) at Toke Makinwa for milking their father continually despite being aware of his indebtedness. Obviously, as a married man, the love tango isn't expected to be a smooth one at least not from the woman that has proudly given him five grown up sons. If I may ask, would you then blame these children for making so much noise over the internet, spouting words on Toke to cut off all romantic ties with their beloved father? On a second thought, I sometimes wonder how most Nigerians reason myopically, perhaps just to follow the bandwagon of every other person. Toke Makinwa owes no one an apology or explanation for choosing to engage in an affair with the said man (that's if she even does). Firstly, it's not a priority to other if she engages in such act or not. She's a single woman who's not to be tied down by the rule of what's norm or what's not. If she chooses to engage in an affair with Buhari, I don't think it should affect anyone as far as your survival is not hindered and Aisha is not complaining. Having ended her marriage on the basis of infidelity from her partner does not exterminate her from other relationships. Perhaps, I've forgotten the concept of infidelity but I think if there is any infidel here, it should be Festus Fadeyi. He was not under influence or coercion when he chose to step out of his matrimonial home to make out with Toke. If he chooses to marry Toke legally, it should be no one's source of headache as far he's able to balance the rope of responsibility in polygamy. Or did any law state that a married man can't wed a divorcee? I'm sure Nigerians would have also pointed fingers at Toke if it was discovered that she was making out with an eighteen year old guy. I really don't know how far we think before reacting to issues. More so, most accusations have been on the basis of ‘milking an indebted man’. Toke has no involvement in this man's industrial business and I'm very certain he was aware of his indebtedness before choosing to make out with her. Every woman appreciates material things (money as one) and that's one of the factors that can make a girl go head over heels for any man. Money can necessarily sustain a relationship these days (to an extent) and that's why only few girls can stay with a broke guy. Get thirty billion in your account and see how girls will sprawl at your door. I don't think the constitution web her around for receiving money from a supposed lover! What should she have received? I'm sure all those women pointing fingers would have done worse if they were in the same shoes. They would assemble on the social media to display ‘holier than the holiest’ and one of them might just have broken up with her lover because of one hundred naira airtime. If Toke have to refuse his gifts, it would be based on personal decision(s) and not general beliefs. When I see two women fighting on the street because of a cheating partner, I'm aggrieved. Those boys screaming on the net for Toke to leave their father are simply unwise. If there'd be anybody to throw baubles of criticisms at, it should be their father and not the woman who could as well be their stepmother in times to come. Most minds have been built in such a way that you see any third party as a threat but if the wall isn't cracked, the lizard can't gain penetration. If Mr. Festus wasn't interested, there was no degree of seduction or temptation that could have made him fall or even ask her out in the first place? Why do we hold women to higher moral scruples simply because we believe their supposed weaknesses could be used against them? Why is it right for a man to cheat and outright wrong for a woman to cheat? As weird as this might be, why is it logically right for a man to have two wives and wrong for a woman to have two husbands? Why must the woman bear the brunt of the man and face blames for all wrongdoings? Why is the woman always painted as the devil and the man, angel? When a man is caught in bed with another woman, we claim he was seduced and tempted but when a woman is caught doing the same thing, we call her a whore and slut shame her? I wonder what we would have said if the table turned and Toke was the one spending on the man. It's an absurd argument to claim she bleached her skin with the money gotten from the supposed mogul or she was bought a brand new Range Rover worth 50 million naira. It's not your problem, it doesn't concern you in anyway as far as it's not your money! The reason behind Skye Bank loaning billions of naira to him doesn't call for unneeded digging. As far as Skye Bank is not crying of bankruptcy, I see no reason why you would deter from your itching scrotum to focus on what two consented adults chose to do in privacy. Dear children of Dr. Festus Fadeyi, you can leave Toke out of the unnecessary mess you're causing and face your father. I am however certain that if he is not financially certain of himself, he wouldn't get involved in those expenses and what if he chooses to? The public crying out there don't even know what the man is facing in his private life, you don't know what happens behind closed doors. Whether he's a slave to his matrimonial wife, you know not but you rather chose to talk because everyone is talking. I pray, wisdom smile on us some day. Charles Orlando has said it all:‘People don't cheat because of who you are...they cheat because of who they are not’.    

What is X?

By Tim Nwabilo Numbers. Patterns. Lines. Everything connected and he loved how he picked out the connections, plotted the dots, how he just knew. He...

Joy of Christmas

A whole year is dead And the joy of human abounds, The celebration of season has come, Christmas is here again. Well-wishes flow around, From friends and foes, The joy...

Celebrities Get ready to Storm SRAF Awards and Movies Night 

As the scheduled date of the maiden edition of Soul’e Rhymez and Friends’ (SRAF) awards and movies night draw near, hopes and anticipation soar high up to the greatest altitudes in all and sundry. According to the convener, Stephen Eneji, the event is basically geared at celebrating the end of the SRAF calendar, awarding its competitors and reaching out to emerging and established leaders. It has been carefully packaged and scheduled to hold on the 15th of December 2017 all night at BBCM Auditorium, 28, Owokoniran street, Surulere, Lagos. Furthermore, he hinted that winners of the award categories that range from outstanding leadership, most creative personality of the year, most influential personality of the year, entrepreneur of the year, blogger of the year, music artiste of the year, on air personality of the year, sport personality of the year, song of the year, comedian of the year, NGO of the year, poetry promoter of the year, DJ of the year, music video director of the year, actress of the year, actor of the year to movie of the year, student poet of the year and others would be picked through public voting. He added that that red carpet would start at 6pm while the award show would be by 9pm. Like an icing on the cake, the audience would also be entertained with two blockbuster movies that will begin at exactly 2am. The event which is expected to be graced by celebrities like Odunlade Adekola, Funke Akindele (Jennifer), Kingsley Uwachukwu, Ireti Doyle, Kehinde Bankole, Emmanuel Ikubese, Seun Ajayi, Mr Eriata, Miss Gloria Maduka as well as many entrepreneurs will feature stage drama, spoken word poetry and musical performances from a number of artistes including Josh, Walex, JC, Schools, ConA’stone, Oxlade Natalio, Fr33zinPaul, Honeybee, SunSamPaul, BBCM drama group, etc. To get tickets to the event, click on this link: https://spay.ng/zaddishcom/5          

Oro, Egungun and Women

By Yusuf Gemini After the creation of the earth, gods were moulded by Ajalamopin, the potter of the pantheon. Every god has its own shrine...

CupidsRisk, Episode 29

29: A Dangerous Invitation ...By Atala Wala Wala  The car pulled up just outside the bank, and Iphey stepped out, anxiously glancing at her watch again. The window on her side slid down, and Chinedu peered through it. “Are you sure you'll be OK? I hope your boss won't eat you alive for this,” he asked. “I will be a few minutes late, but I should be fine; I'll find an excuse that will work. At least, as far as I know, there's no meeting that I need to be present at.” Iphey still wondered whether Funmi had a nasty shock waiting for her when she got back, but that was something she could worry about later. Right now, she felt so happy at the prospect at starting something really solid with Chinedu that everything else paled in comparison. “OK. Oh - before I forget - can I get your number? You can be sure that I have no intention of deleting it this time - but I'll make up a song with the numbers in it, just in case I lose the phone,” he joked. Iphey laughed as she gave it to him. “Please call me, and let's set something up.” Chinedu smiled back. “Yes, let's see if we can start afresh. Actually, I just remembered that you don't have your own transport to get back. How about we kill  two  birds  with  one  stone?  I  can  pick  you  up  this  evening,  we  can  go somewhere nice and then I can drop you off at home.” “That sounds like a great idea.”   “Yes, I thought so too. OK, I'll see you later.” He waved at her, and watched admiringly as she walked towards the bank entrance. Then the window slid back up, the engine revved and the car took off towards his office. **** As he drove, Chinedu was lost in thought. He really wanted to make things work with Iphey, and he was glad that he had this chance... but he recalled her unease about his history as an armed robber. “Sometimes, I wonder why I had to go and say that. Perhaps things would have been better if I had kept this close to my chest,” he mused. The more he thought about it, the more he felt it would be better to make a clean breast of things and tell her what had happened in his earlier years... Chinedu and his four younger siblings were had grown up in Ajegunle, where their father worked as a clerk in an office and their mum sold provisions in a small store. But it was not a happy marriage; the money both their parents brought in was rarely ever enough to feed them all, so there were always rows over why the children did not have school uniforms and books, or when the rent was going to be paid so that the landlord would stop harassing them. Chinedu remembered those rows with a shudder; they were violent, searing affairs that left him with ugly memories. He also remembered his father often saying to him and his siblings in a bitter voice: “See the suffering that being poor can bring. If you know what is good for you, make sure you study well so that you can get a good job and live in a big house, not this..” gesturing around their cramped one-bedroom apartment. So he coped in his own way by immersing himself in his studies; perhaps he could spirit them away from this miserable existence if he became a doctor, or an engineer. Fortunately for him, his ability matched his desire, and he excelled at school, so it looked like his hopes might become reality. Unfortunately, at the end of his second to last year in secondary school, his parents separated. His father was tired of being belittled by his wife and left to stay with another woman he had been having an affair with; his mother was only too glad to see him go, as it would mean an end to the endless beatings and abuse. But that meant that the burden of looking after the five of them weighed even more heavily on her, and in the end, this meant that Chinedu had to help to augment the family income by acting as an Alabaru, a load porter at the local market. Needless to say, this meant an end to his studies. Chinedu recalled his time at the market with mixed feelings. He missed going to school; in addition, the work was hard and competition for customers was fierce. However, he soon realised that the place was alive in a way that he had never  experienced  as  an  ordinary market-goer. There was  always  something going on; in addition, there was a whole underside to life in the area that he had never realised existed until he started hearing stories from the sellers and other regulars who frequented the place. He soon made two friends, Polycarp and Gbenro. Polycarp was a friendly, rather quiet boy who had also been working at the market as a porter for two years. But Chinedu was more more drawn to Gbenro, a much livelier person who always seemed to have a ready jest on his lips. One of the area boys, Gbenro was his nickname, no one seemed to know his real names. Chinedu also noticed that although Gbenro was not much older than him and did not always do any specific job with the area boys, he always seemed to have a good deal to spend. His curiosity pestered him to find out more; he still longed to return to school, but the meagre tips he got from his work meant that this would be a long time coming. “So Gbenro, how you come get all dis money wey you dey spend yanfu-yanfu for here, now? No be only this area boy work you dey do here?” he asked one day, after his curiosity would give him peace no longer. “Ah, bro... dat one na special ting...” Gbenro looked shifty all of a sudden. “I fit tell you, but...” “But wetin?” Impatience joined curiosity in prodding him. Chinedu gave a deep sigh. This was the moment he often replayed in his head; the moment his life took a dramatic turn, as a sequence of events began to unfold. It turned out that Gbenro, who ran errands for a gang of armed robbers in the area, had actually been waiting for an opportunity to recruit him to be a part  of  the  gang.  So  Chinedu  started out  as  an  errand  boy,  passing  along information; due to his popularity and having grown up in the area, he knew almost everyone. With time, he graduated to being a participant in the actual robberies, either as a lookout or driver. It had all been part of the excitement of being a teenager, he played cops and robbers and saved some money for his GCE exam. He assuaged any lingering doubts by thinking that no one was being hurt. Until the day everything went horribly, horribly wrong. 30: Operation gone wrong...by Atala Wala Wala.  It was the evening of what had been a dull and rainy day. Chinedu was waiting in a room with two other men; he had been asked to 'report for duty', as an operation was scheduled for this night. He was nervous, because unlike the past few operations, he had not been given any details. While he waited, he tried to pry information from the other two men. Serubawon, tough and surly, ignored him  altogether;  Chancer,  quiet  and  tense,  told  him to wait for their leader, Dabaru, to come - he would tell him everything. Chinedu was edgy because the people he was more familiar with, Gbenro and a few others, were not there. About an hour later, the door opened, and Dabaru entered, followed by Okey, another member of the gang. Dabaru was a tall, rangy man who had the air of someone  scenting  for  danger  around  him.  He  had  been  involved  in  armed robbery for over five years; more than once, his sharp instincts had helped him evade capture. He called them all to gather round so that he could explain the night's operation. “We are going to this address in Lekki tonight. I hear that someone there is keeping some money there this night.” He stared fiercely at one of the other boys, “Okey, you know the place, right? The place I showed you when we were driving in the area the other day.” Chinedu was puzzled. “Is Okey driving tonight?” he asked. Dabaru turned to him and smiled. “Yes, Okey is driving instead of you. I think it's time that you took part in a actual operation.” He turned back to the others and continued explaining details of the operation, but Chinedu's mind was elsewhere. He knew that this day would come one day, but he hadn't thought that it would come so soon. His heart beat faster as he thought of what would happen. He had gone on shooting practice sessions with the gang before, but practice was one thing; real life was something else. Eventually, Dabaru finished with the explanations and told them all to get into the car waiting outside; the guns they needed were already in the boot. As Chinedu passed him, he put his hand on his shoulder and said “We will make six million naira from this operation; I know you will not disappoint. Just be strong like you were in the last operation.” Then he followed them out and entered the car, which promptly revved and sped off towards Lekki. Chinedu shook his head as he recalled how horribly wrong the operation had gone. His role had been to climb over the wall of the compound at the address, then threaten to shoot the compound guard if he did not open the gate for the rest of his colleagues. Unfortunately, the guard had panicked and run towards the house, raising the alarm. Chinedu had him in his sights; but he found that he could  not  bring  himself  to  pull  the  trigger.  He  stood  there,  sweating  and trembling, as the rest of the gang shouted at him to let them in. Suddenly, there was a gunshot, and he felt a sharp pain in his leg. The robbers heard the shot, and that was their cue to flee. Chinedu collapsed and as he lay on the ground, blood seeping through his jeans, he heard the wail of sirens in the distance growing louder. He woke up the next day at Apongbon. Five days later, the police doctor had bandaged the flesh wound on his leg inflicted by the house owner's pistol but the pain in his heart went deeper. While his answers to the interrogations had saved him some beating, he had been charged for armed robbery. His mother had visited once but there was nothing she or anyone could do. He was not up for bail and the police were were almost ready to transfer him to Kirikiri. He was sitting quietly while the other inmates raved and ranted, when a couple of prison guards approached his cell and unlocked it. The prisoners began to chant at the guards, but they glared fiercely back and pointed to Chinedu. “You... come with us. Oga wants to see you.” Which oga, and why does he want to see me? Chinedu wondered, as they walked down the dark corridors that led to the prison‟s chief superintendent‟s office. The guards knocked and entered. Two men were sitting at the table; one was dressed in uniform - Chinedu guessed that he was the superintendent - and the other was tall, dark and wore an expensive babanriga. “Is that the boy?” the tall man asked, pointing at Chinedu. “Yes, sah,” one of the guards replied. “Hmm...” The man stroked his chin for a while, and then he spoke. “You... you were brought in from an armed robbery, right?” others and continued explaining details of the operation, but Chinedu's mind was elsewhere. He knew that this day would come one day, but he hadn't thought that it would come so soon. His heart beat faster as he thought of what would happen. He had gone on shooting practice sessions with the gang before, but practice was one thing; real life was something else. Eventually, Dabaru finished with the explanations and told them all to get into the car waiting outside; the guns they needed were already in the boot. As Chinedu passed him, he put his hand on his shoulder and said “We will make six million naira from this operation; I know you will not disappoint. Just be strong like you were in the last operation.” Then he followed them out and entered the car, which promptly revved and sped off towards Lekki. Chinedu shook his head as he recalled how horribly wrong the operation had gone. His role had been to climb over the wall of the compound at the address, then threaten to shoot the compound guard if he did not open the gate for the rest of his colleagues. Unfortunately, the guard had panicked and run towards the house, raising the alarm. Chinedu had him in his sights; but he found that he could  not  bring  himself  to  pull  the  trigger.  He  stood  there,  sweating  and trembling, as the rest of the gang shouted at him to let them in. Suddenly, there was a gunshot, and he felt a sharp pain in his leg. The robbers heard the shot, and that was their cue to flee. Chinedu collapsed and as he lay on the ground, blood seeping through his jeans, he heard the wail of sirens in the distance growing louder. He woke up the next day at Apongbon. Five days later, the police doctor had bandaged the flesh wound on his leg inflicted by the house owner's pistol but the pain in his heart went deeper. While his answers to the interrogations had saved him some beating, he had been charged for armed robbery. His mother had visited once but there was nothing she or anyone could do. He was not up for bail and the police were were almost ready to transfer him to Kirikiri. He was sitting quietly while the other inmates raved and ranted, when a couple of prison guards approached his cell and unlocked it. The prisoners began to chant at the guards, but they glared fiercely back and pointed to Chinedu. “You... come with us. Oga wants to see you.” Which oga, and why does he want to see me? Chinedu wondered, as they walked down the dark corridors that led to the prison‟s chief superintendent‟s office. The guards knocked and entered. Two men were sitting at the table; one was dressed in uniform - Chinedu guessed that he was the superintendent - and the other was tall, dark and wore an expensive babanriga. “Is that the boy?” the tall man asked, pointing at Chinedu. “Yes, sah,” one of the guards replied. “Hmm...” The man stroked his chin for a while, and then he spoke. “You... you were brought in from an armed robbery, right?”   Chinedu, staring in astonishment could only nod his head. “I am Alhaji Galadima,” the man continued. “I am here to talk about the gang that you were part of...” It  turned  out  that  the Alhaji,  who  was  a  police  officer,  was  looking  for information that would help him end the operations of Chinedu‟s former gang, who were still active in the area. On inquiring, he learnt of Chinedu who had been part of the gang, but was now in custody. Galadima realised after talking at length with Chinedu that he had no great loyalty to the gang members, as they had abandoned him the moment he had been caught, and had not contacted or been to see him since. Chinedu said he would co-operate with the police in supplying information. Galadima also saw from the conversation that Chinedu was quite an intelligent person, and soon teased out the circumstances that led to him joining the gang. His co-operation led to two members of the gang, Serubawon and Okey, being caught. It also meant that the Alhaji was able to arrange for him to be released sooner, and in addition, he volunteered to fund Chinedu‟s education to university level “because it would be a shame for such a fine young mind to go to waste.” Chinedu‟s eyes misted over as he remembered the Alhaji‟s benevolence, but he quickly wiped the wetness away, as he slowed down his car to park at his office.   *****************************   Please, click on our ads.