CupidsRisk, Episode 31

The Charmer and Danger! ...by Happy BBB   Ngozi whisked the eggs steadily, slowly adding butter and sugar, swiftly turning them in, it was a...

The Brand of Cain, Episode 30

  By Larry Sun “What does the criminal want to come back for? He shot Cain and went away with the pistol. Do you think he would come back to check if the victim had died? One rarely survives a bullet to the head. And the idea of looking for fingerprints or whatever print there is is impossible.” “May I ask why?” “Because I know, but permit me to chip one reason into your palm-oil-soaked brain—a strong wind blew on that Saturday morning, didn’t it?” “I don’t know. And as Lincoln said, ‘Ignorance is preferable to error.’ ” “I believe it was Thomas Jefferson that made that statement, Famous.” He shrugged indifferently, “Anyway, I can’t remember a strong wind blowing that morning.” “I confirmed from an outsider, a strong wind did blow. So, any print there might have been cleared. Remember, where the corpse was lying was quite sandy, if you will agree with me.” “Agreed,” Daniel sighed, “But still, I don’t think this crime can be solved.” “O! Ye of little faith! Since when were you baptized a pessimist? Have you forgotten Hakeem’s words so soon?” Even a part of him felt some of the air bleeding out of his own balloon of optimism. “Okay, okay,” he said grudgingly, “I wish you luck.” Even for bad luck, he thought, one needs luck. “Us.” Daniel felt he was in a dystopian investigative chamber because to him, everything was going forth in the wrong directions, he asked hastily, “Who should I call in this time?” “Not now. Right now, we’ll do another thing. We are going to search the dead man’s bedroom.” Daniel was flabbergasted, “What!” “You heard me right.” The police officer shook his head, “I’ve never probed into other people’s secrecy before in my life.” “Then today is your first chance, grab onto it.” “I’m not looking forward to the pleasure, sir.” “And who said you had any choice here?” “Lord,” he breathed as he got up; he didn’t know he had just said the world’s shortest prayer. “What have I gotten myself into?” The detective also stood up and said cheerfully, “Let’s go a fishing.” As they headed towards the door, Daniel wiped the sweat forming on his forehead with the back of his hand and muttered under his breath, “What a crazy being this detective is?”   FIFTEEN Daniel Famous was astonished; the mysterious gumshoe had not been sweating all through their moments in the suffocating box called the interrogation room. The outside breeze was refreshing and he breathed as much as he could with every heaving of his chest, he had appreciated the importance of the free oxygen after learning the day before that suffocation had been considered one of the most painful means of meeting one’s ancestors. He was still not supporting the idea of searching the deceased's room but all efforts and means he had employed to discourage the detective had proven futile, Lot’s mind was set on the task. “You are forgetting what we’re here for,” said Lot calmly, “Let me remind you, we are here to unlock secrets lurking behind doors in this building.” He pointed. Both men went into the building. The detective looked interestingly at the lawyer who was sitting beside the widow—their thighs, he noticed, were not very far apart, both were apparently discussing in a low voice; he was surprised that they had not seen them enter, their voices were too faint to be heard, Lot tried to listen by straining his eardrums but he could not hear, all he was able to catch were: ‘don’t worry, everything is fine now’. It was the lawyer who said that to the widow. Daniel saw them discussing and felt a brief pang of jealousy within himself. If he had had a hammer he would have bashed the lawyer’s head in. The soporific effect of the air-conditioner in the large room had made its impact on Richard, he was lying asleep on the three-seater; Lot was contemplating if he was really asleep as he looked or he was faking it, and amidst the atmosphere of the silent ennui was Hakeem on his feet swaying to whatever was pulsing through the headphones of his Discman, he was throwing himself around the room like a whirling demented dervish. He bellowed in delight as he saw Daniel and Lot. At one corner of the room, a mobile phone had been placed on a charger inserted in the electric wall socket. As Daniel watched as the light of the charger pulse off-and-on he felt it had a kind of connection with himself and the case they were trying to investigate, in which ideas and motives behind the late man’s action that night pulsed off and on in his own mind, too. “Have you found the stupid man who killed Mr. Martins?” he asked seriously. “Not yet,” replied Daniel, after gulping air. Hakeem frowned, “Why? I want to kick that idiot so much that my boots will have to be surgically removed from his bottom. Seriously, I pray whoever killed Mr. Martins have AIDS.” The detective smiled. “Please, make your investigations snappy,” said the boy, “I cannot wait to kick the baboon.” Daniel Famous swallowed hard and said, “Yes, sir.” The boy faced Lot and Daniel, “You know I told you that I wanted to help on this case, and I have been doing some thinkings of my own. Do you know what I have been trying to do? I was trying to put two and five and eight together to get seven. It cannot be done, it simply cannot be done.” “You can’t know the killer; you’re not a detective, are you?” “Okay, I give up, let us ask the tec. Do you know the criminal, sir?” “No,” Lot replied, and before the boy could protest any further the detective added, “But I have an idea of whom the person might be.” “That’s nice,” brightened up Hakeem, “Who is the one?” The detective looked with calm eyes at the boy, “And you expect me to tell you?” The boy nodded vigorously, like one of those crazy dolls at the back screens of cars.   “Then follow me. Let me tell you the murderer in person.” As the boy began to rise from his seat, Lot added, “But you may be killed too.” That scared Hakeem and he involuntarily relaxed back in his seat, “What have I done wrong?” he screamed. “Many things,” answered Lot, “One, you saw the body first; two, you called the policeman; three, you want to know the murderer; and four, which is the most devastating reason—you want to kick him in the bottom. I strongly suggest that you keep out of this. If there’s a murderer lurking around the corners, be he of flesh and blood or atmospheric vapour, summon not his attention to thyself, wise one.” The boy shook his head and said hastily, “I do not need to know him anymore; I am not ready to nod a flying bullet.” “Better,” Lot looked around and asked, “Where’s the doctor?” “Here,” the doctor replied from the door, “I went to make a call to the morgue concerning the deceased. Can I see you a moment, detective?” Both men went out and returned a few seconds later, looking as placid as possible. The doctor calmly took his seat and Inspector Lot faced Abigail. “Mrs. Martins,” he said, “We’ll like to search your bedroom, since I understand that you and your late husband shared the same bedroom.” “If I may ask, Mr. Detective, what do you want there?” “Just a general inspection,” said Daniel, “We are hoping to find something which can help us on this case.” Daniel had intentionally spoken so as to have the attention of the woman to himself. Abigail looked at him and smiled warmly, her smile almost sent his head spinning. “You are free to go,” she said, “Just don’t check my wardrobes, you might find a skull.” She laughed and pointed to the entrance, “That’s the room.” “You’re a funny woman, Mrs. Martins. I’ll laugh next week.” Said Lot, without any trace of amusement on his countenance, “We will appreciate it if you lead us, ma’am.” ********************************************   Thanks for reading our story. Stay connected for another episode and click on our ads.

CupidsRisk, Episode 30

  Office Politics: The plans of mice and men...by Afronuts    He sat behind his mahogany desk starring into space, his chin nestled in his palms. His eyes were wide open but his vision was nil; he was lost in dreamland. He  could  see  her;  young,  beautiful  and  promising.  Everything  about  her enchanted him. Her smile was unique and different from what he‟d ever seen on the other women around him. Yet with all the appeal she exuded, she seemed more innocent than a catholic nun. And like the sugar ant, he was trapped by this alluring innocent sweetness. He was a man imprisoned by the unholy passion that reeked of lust and desire for a woman he had no right to own. But in his world, the story was different. He had some degree of power and since power could corrupt, he was a very willing candidate The Intercom on Ayo‟s desk suddenly buzzed sharply startling him out of his reverie. The dreamy image of Iphey he had beheld suddenly faded into the obscurity of his subconscious. He tapped at the intercom button, more out of anger than of urgency. „Yes?‟ „Sir, you have a visitor, a Miss Giwa from Abuja.‟ Ayo‟s mind did a brain check. He couldn‟t recollect anybody by that name. His mind raced with suspicion. As a man of many escapades, he had to be careful with visits from females. Not every woman that romped with him should get to visit him at work. He got up and strolled to his door and peeped through the pigeon hole. There was a gorgeously dressed woman standing at the secretary‟s desk but he could only see her back view. „Sir? Are you there?‟ The secretary‟s voice came through the intercom again. He hurried back to the table and tapped the intercom button. „Let her in.‟ He couldn‟t tell who she was but from the „good look‟ of things through his pigeon hole, he was willing to take the risk. The door swung open and Ayo was awed as he beheld the feminine spectacle that waltzed into his office. Her svelte figure bore a body fitting red dress with rosy frills at the edges which stopped at her knees, exposing a set of long caramel tanned legs. She wore a long hair that sat gracefully on her shoulders; her face looked spotless and fresher than a baby‟s butt. She wore no make-up except lip gloss. From the look of it, she didn‟t even need make-up. That would be an overstatement. She smiled, closed the door, walked up slowly to his desk and peered down at him through her sparkling eyes, well enhanced by contact lenses. „Hello Ayo.‟ „Umm…hello?‟ he muttered, standing up to receive her hand shake, while trying hard to recollect where on earth he had met her. „It‟s me, Jennifer.‟ Jennifer Giwa. Her name suddenly triggered something in Ayo‟s head as memories came flooding his mind like a tsunami; the day he met her through a friend at a conference organized by the CBN two years ago at Abuja, how she had seduced him at the after party only to leave him hanging at the table because of some important call she got that required her to go to the ladies; how he had waited till the party was over and she never came back. The mind update finished and he came back to the real world. „Ha! Jennifer. What a pleasant surprise. How did you find me?‟ He had every reason to be angry about how he was ditched two years ago but her smile and bewitching eyes had an effect too powerful to neither ignore nor allow any other sentiment. „I‟ll  always  find  you.  I  have  connections.  And  you  gave  me  your  card, remember?‟ She came round his table and stood very close to his chair. An exotic perfume assailed his nostrils. Her hand went to his chin and caressed it softly. Ayo felt his armpits go wet as he t„I missed you.‟ Her soft voice was taunting the hormonal noises in him. „You left me behind…‟ „Shhh…I know and I‟m sorry‟ She sat on his lap while still holding onto his chin. Ayo‟s  heart  skipped  several  times.  A  woman‟s  acceptance  of  fault  and apology coupled with this smooshy drama was like sweet wine to his soul. „So what brings you here?‟ He was still able to summon up the common sense to find out why she came. His brain was trying hard to be rational against the building rage of sensual adrenalin. „I need your help with a loan. Can I count on you?‟ By this time she had drawn her face so close to his, he felt himself beginning to loose control. She leaned closer, her breath fanned gently against his face, her lips almost brushing against his…when the intercom buzzed. Ayo‟s fist slammed at the button, heavily pissed at the interruption. „What?‟ He half yelled at the intercom. „Sir! The operations manager is on her way to your office!‟ his secretary‟s voice came whispering through the speaker. Thanks to the regular tipping he gave her to serve as his lookout for trouble. Like a jackrabbit smoked out of its hole, Ayo came to his senses, pushed Jennifer off his lap and quickly ushered her into the toilet. „What‟s going on?‟ she asked taken aback by his sudden reaction. „I promise you dear. I‟ll get you the loan. But I need to settle some matters with people that might be a pain in the neck. Just hide here for a few minutes and keep quiet. Trust me, okay?‟ She  wasn‟t  sure  she  understood  all  he  had  just  said  but  she  very  well understood the part about getting the loan. „Okay. If you say so.‟ She walked gracefully into the restroom. Ayo closed the door just as Funmi came into the office. She was already halfway into the office when she stopped dead in her tracks, her nose twitched. „What‟s that smell?‟ „Excuse me?‟ „Is that a woman‟s perfume I perceive?‟ „So? Are you the only female staff that wears a perfume?‟ 'Are you sure that girl is not in here?' 'What girl?' Funmi waved her hand in annoyance. „You know who I'm talking about. I actually came to complain about her…‟ otally lost his composure. „The door is locked‟, she said in a tone that demanded an explanation. „It‟s under repairs and fumigation, you probably heard the rat in there.‟ Her hand quickly left the door. She hated rats and the mere mention of it. „I thought you were hiding Iphey in there.‟ Ayo burst into laughter. „Stop it. It‟s not funny.‟ The intercom buzzed. Ayo hit the button. „Yes?‟ „Sir, Iphey‟s coming! She‟s looking for Oga Funmi‟ The secretary‟s whisper came loud and clear. „Did she say Iphey?‟ Funmi asked. „Yep. She did.‟ She gave a flustered look, refusing to meet his eyes. She now felt embarrassed that she might have overreacted. She turned and walked to the door. „Good thing she watches out for us.‟ She said. „Us?‟ Ayo questioned but she was out the door before he could get a reply. He heard her dialogue briefly in her usual nastiness with Iphey outside the door. Then they were gone. He suddenly realized there were beads of sweat on his forehead and mopped them rapidly. For a brief moment, the thought of Iphey came to his mind again. Funmi wanted her out of the picture, out of this branch or sacked for some flimsy reason but he wasn‟t going to let that happen. Funmi had served her purpose and was married now. He needed a replacement and Iphey was the perfect and even better fit. He would handle all this later. For now he had other pressing matters. He knocked on the restroom door. „You can come out now.‟ He heard the lock turn and Jennifer came out. She was smiling. She had heard all the drama. „You‟re a bad boy. Is that how you trick women?‟ „Come on. Not all women, like fingers, are equal.‟ „By the way, thanks for locking the door. I never thought of it‟, he said placing himself back in his chair. „I might look gentle but I‟m not a stupid chick‟, she replied stroking his face with her well manicured fingers. „Now, where were we?‟ Office Politics: The Plans of Mice and Men 2...by Myne and Tisha  “So where were you?” Funmi bit out striding angrily out of Ayo's office. I left a file on your desk earlier this morning and now I cannot find it!” After the discovery of Funmi and Bisi's alliance this morning, it was easy to guess how the missing file and all the other ones in the past including other different things that should have gotten her into trouble happened. “I did not see any file on my desk,” Iphey replied as she fell into step behind. “How will you? Going out for lunch and staying two hours!” Funmi turned around and glared at her. She felt like throttling the other girl's neck. Bisi had given her the lowdown on their confrontation and she was mad as hell. Imagine the small girl, after displacing her friend, she had the guts to stand up to her! Well Bisi could blame herself for trying to befriend her in the first place. See where that had gotten her. “It wasn't like...” Iphey began. “Pschewwwww,” Funmi hissed. By now they were standing in front of her office. “Just find that file!” She snapped testily and then left Iphey standing there. She stalked in and slammed the door behind her. Iphey walked to the water dispenser and pressed out some water in a white plastic cup and headed to her desk. She walked gingerly since it seemed even her steps annoyed some people to no end. Iphey laughed inside, her time in the ladies before searching for Funmi showed that she was still looking great. But more than that she felt great inside. After the last few hours, she was in no mood for more drama today. It  was  like  the  day  had  flown  by,  so  many  things  had  happened,  one revelation after another. After Bisi, she had shrugged it off to focus on better things and something beautiful had really come her way. She sashayed as behind her mind‟s eye she could see Chinedu, tall, dark and handsome. Such men were a dime a dozen, but Chinedu stood out from the rest, his features were imprinted in her head so even if she closed her eyes, she could still see him and it was weird but it seemed like they were connected. Iphey smiled. She was working alright, but only just managing to concentrate. Half of her mind was on Chinedu. She could not even remember what the reasons for her not wanting to go out with him in the first place were. Yes, he had a shady history but he had showed himself to be an honorable man so far and those were the qualities that really mattered to her. “A penny for your thoughts,” Tunde from marketing teased her, you are grinning like the cat that got the cream.” Iphey laughed. Tunde thought it a contagious laughter that demanded for all who heard it to laugh also. He grinned widely at her. “Are you sure you are not getting it somewhere?” he finally asked a quizzical look on his face. “I don‟t do premarital sex if that‟s what you are asking?” Iphey laughed again, “I just don‟t see why you can‟t be happy and in love in a relationship without premarital sex?” “You look like someone has given you some good loving,” he insisted with a wink. “Actually I am just happy o, no particular reason, God‟s been good.” “Uh hmm…tell me...” Funmi was passing by and gave them a dirty look. “Tunde, Ayo wants you, now!” Tunde stood to attention, blinked at Iphey and marched off. Funmi did not pause in her tracks. She was walking with Bisi, who kept her face strictly ahead. A few paces behind them, Tola for Master Card section gave Iphey a smile and a wave. Iphey smiled back and went back to the files before her. Iphey smiled to herself as she relived the kiss with Chinedu in the car. Her toes curled in her pumps and began to tingle. She considered whether to call him or wait for him to call first. She didn't want to make any hasty decision but it was not as if she was planning to marry him in the next month, she was just going to give him a chance to see if they could make it work between themselves. She remembered what she discussed with Aisha a couple of weeks ago. After they had discussed finding Bisi in his apartment, the conversation had diverged to general talk. “Aisha, most girls are hasty to get into serious or permanent relationships. For me, I have now decided that I'll give the guy a test-drive…” Aisha‟s eyes went wide, “Do you mean…?” Iphey grinned mischievously, “No, not the way people usually mean a test- drive. I mean a time frame in which I check out the guy and see if I like him on all levels and can check if we are on the same levels when it comes to values and compatibility of personalities.” Aisha smiled and said, “That‟s what most people do but they define it with different terms.” They both laughed before Aisha continued. “As long as you don't end up in a marriage of convenience.” Iphey sighed and said, “I could never do a marriage of convenience, I would drive someone crazy.” She smiled again and set her pen down. If she did end up with Chinedu, it would  be  nothing  like  that.  She  was  already  halfway  in  love  with  him. Something moved beside her and when she focused her vision, she watched her boss, Ayo seeing off a slinky lady. On his way back, he caught her eye and leered. When he saw that he had got her full attention, he stopped, rubbed his hands and licked his lips. Iphey turned away quickly. Did he think she found those gestures attractive? They were a disgusting turn-off. She hissed quietly. Out of the corner of her eye, Iphey spied Funmi striding towards him. Let them  sort  themselves  out  and  leave  her  out  of  it,  she  prayed.  At  least  her adversaries will be reduced at the office when Bisi got sent forth on Friday. Now that she knew Funmi was out to get her sacked, she just had to be more careful with her work, keep her head down. She worked steadily, yet before long her mind was on Chinedu again. She was tired of doing the battle of not thinking about Chinedu, so she let her mind linger on him, she had better do something about this. She day dreamed about the kiss all over again. His lips on hers, their tongues meshing, his hands on her waist, holding her tightly. Iphey sighed. And to think she had been dreaming about him without knowing until this morning. That should have told her she would meet him. It was a course-mate in college who said that “when you start dreaming about a guy, love is either setting the  wheels  rolling  or  about  to  blot  him  from  your  horizon”.  The  first  was possible, the first had proved impossible so far. It looked like Chinedu had come to stay. She was happy it was no more all in her mind, where he‟d been loitering all day and night for the past couple of weeks. She looked forward to seeing him later in the evening when he came to pick her up. She asked herself whether she had time to call and tell Aisha about Chinedu, and that they were finally going to give it a go. She also wanted them to talk so she would have all the back ground information she needed. She needed advice about the way to proceed with this guy since she believed he was something special. Her mom was going to be so happy but she herself had to be sure that was not making a mistake. The case of James was still pending. “Here you go.” Iphey snapped out of her reverie and looked up. Jane stood before her, hand outstretched. She was holding a file. “The shark didn't know that I saw her hiding it in the bulk counter room. No mind her, you hear?” Jane smiled as she handed the file over. “Thank you so much.” Iphey clapped quietly as the receptionist walked away. God was on her side sha, all her enemies will be scattered for sure! He had guided her every step so definitely. His hand was evident on every part of her life. It would all work out fine with Chinedu too, all she needed to do was put one step in front of the other and commit it into His hands… *************************************** Thanks for reading. Do click on our ads and stay connected for another episode.

The Brand of Cain, Episode 29

By Larry Sun, “That is highly possible, but opening the gate without my awareness is highly impossible. My room is by the gate and that gate makes more noise than rolling back the door of a tomb of a pharaoh dead two thousand years.” “Maybe you were drugged into unconsciousness and the gate was opened with the duplicates.” Daniel chipped in. “And the single horn of a car was able to rouse me into consciousness?” asked Chima, “I’m not a deep sleeper, not at my age, and if I was drugged I would have known, don’t you think so?” Daniel could not say any more word.  Chima continued, “Even if Cain had to die, his corpse should have been inside and not outside. When that man,” he pointed to Daniel, “and the boy called me that there was a dead body by the gate I thought it was the driver they were referring, but I was shocked when I saw that it was Cain, I’m still very confused.” The detective sighed. “Is that all?” he asked Chima. “No,” the old man dipped his hand in his breast pocket and extracted a folded paper which he handed to the detective. “Maybe this will help.” Lot hesitated a bit before collecting the note, and unfortunately for him, Chima noticed. “What are you scared of, detective? You think it’s a letter bomb?” “Who would want to blow me to smithereens?” “You’ve got the reputation of stepping on a lot of toes in this country, and no bad deed goes unpunished, as you quite know yourself. Everybody knows that Giwa wasn't toasted for minding his own business.” “And from wherever comes that bit of gibberish, old man?” he snatched the paper in anger. The detective opened the paper, and on it was a writing scrawled carelessly in pencil: In the morning, call my lawyer. ––MC The writing was quavery, as if it had been written with the left hand of a right-handed person, or vice versa. Daniel Famous collected the paper and read it. The detective looked up at the gatekeeper and asked, “How did you find this?” “The next morning, not long after I was called to see the body.” “Where did you find it?” “The same place I kept the keys.” “Then you should have seen it when you were called by Daniel and the boy.” “No, I saw it after, when this officer called me, I only put my hand under the pillow without looking, and I withdrew the keys. But it was when I wanted to pick my cap, which I also put under the pillow, that I saw the note lying there.” “Did you read it?” asked Lot. “Shouldn’t I have? Or do you think I can’t read? Well, if I read something that is written down in English, I can understand what it means—I am not talking of abstruse stuff, formulae or philosophy—just plain business-like English—most people can’t! If I want to write down something, I can write down what I mean, I’ve discovered that quite a lot of people in this country can’t do that either! Though you can’t illiterate from my memory the fact that English is a mad man’s language, I’m even surprised that I’m so affluent in speaking that language. And, I can do plain arithmetic—if Aki has eight bananas and Pawpaw takes ten from him, how many will Aki have left? That’s the kind of sum some people likes to pretend has a simple answer. They won’t admit, first, that Pawpaw can’t do it—and second, that there won’t be an answer in plus bananas! Evidently, arithmetic is a blessing in the sky, but nobody knows that.” “That’s the lunacy of Mathematics,” said Daniel, smiling, “We call it Mathematics these days, not Arithmetic.” “Did you hear any strange sound that night?” Lot asked Chima, after silently listening to the gatekeeper’s annoying spiel, and noticing how wanting the older man’s grammar was. “A sound like what?” “Gunshot sound.” “Within or without?” “Which one did you hear?” The gatekeeper hesitated for precisely ten seconds before replying, “Nothing, I heard no sound.” Lot caught the hesitation and he, therefore, looked askance at the gatekeeper, as the older man’s reply was not very convincing, “Are you sure?” he asked him calmly. “Hundred percent.” “Mr. Chima, do you know that withholding vital information is an offence.” “I heard no sound, detective. If I did, I’d have screamed it into your hearing.” “You needn’t be so nasty about it.” Eze smiled, “You have no idea how nasty I can be if I put my mind to it.” Lot tried to find a befitting reply for the gatekeeper but thought better of it. “Now, Mr. Chima, I want you to answer this question truthfully.” “Do you think I’ve been lying before?” “That is left for me to judge.” “Then you’ll still have to judge if my next answer would be the truth or not.” The old man smiled, “I’m a bit of a nuisance to you, right?” “Listen, you senile anachronism, that’s an understatement. You’re probably the most irritating, vexatious man I’ve ever met.” “Sorry, I’m not a very pineapple of politeness.” The detective could take it no more, “The word is ‘pinnacle’.” “That’s what I called it.” Replied Eze. “No, you said ‘pineapple’.” “It’s you who just called it that, not me.”   Lot realized that arguing with the gatekeeper about English usage was insane, he therefore allowed it to slide, “Before you were called by Famous, what were you doing?” “I was doing nothing. I was in my coffin—sorry, cabin.” “Were you asleep or awake?” “I was already awake. Actually, I’m always awake every five in the morning.” “Why?” ‘That’s just my nature, I don’t set the alarm and when it is five, my eyes snap open automatically. It’s like a kind of mechanism in me. Whenever my eyes snap open like that, they don’t shut again. And on that day, the same thing happened, just like this morning or any other day.” “That’s all for now, Mr. Chima. I’ll call you again when I need you.” Lot stopped the recorder. The old man stood up, absently picked the seat of his cloth out from the crack of his bottoms, and started taking his leave, when he got to the door he turned to face the detective. “There’s no point investigating this case,” he said, “Stop wasting your time here. How do you think you will dissolve this mystery if you can’t find any culprit? You may never know the man who did it, just take my advice and leave. You and me know that Cain’s death is not a loss to anybody. So, why investigate it and unlease a hornet’s nest?” “Because I have to. That is what I’m always paid for, trying to find out who murdered people. And ‘You and I’ is the correct grammatical construction of the sentence.” answered Lot, “By the way, what gives you the impression that I can’t find the killer?” “Because he was not killed by anyone among us. I think he was killed by a complete outsider, probably someone he had wronged earlier.” “Really?” Lot feigned surprise. “My instinct told me so; nobody could have possibly killed him between the widow and the driver.” “What about you?” the detective shot out. “What are you trying to incinerate, detective?” The old man’s face changed, “I could have possibly killed him but I didn’t. Cain is too small a kill for me. Besides, I’m not one who hides his deeds, I’ve taken over seventy lives and I don’t feel any remorse for any of them. Bob is my witless, if I had killed Cain I would have told you frankly that I did it. The worst you can do is to persecute me for it, I’m not afraid of anything.” He paused and added, “You are not illegible to be called a detective. When I was in the war, you were nothing but a kid still suckling its mother’s breasts.” Lot stood up abruptly, “Don’t insult me, old man!” “And don’t annoy me, young man!” the gatekeeper retorted. Both men stood glaring at each other before Daniel came between them. The old man gave a weary smile and walked out of the room. Lot sighed again and sat down, “That man is a very dangerous one, I wonder what he might have done.” “You looked at that man and saw a dangerous human being,” said Daniel, “but I saw a man whose life had been filled with tragedy and sadness. I pity him, though he’s not the essence of courtesy. The deaths of his wife and children and what he had endured in battle changed him; all made him a different man. I think he’s a man who needs to be understood. He may actually be a sweet old man.” “Yet, he can be terribly dangerous when he is annoyed. That was actually what I wanted to do, I wanted to annoy him and see his reaction but he didn’t give me the chance.” “What are you talking about, sir? I don’t understand what you are saying.” “Do you remember what he said when I stood up to him?” “He told you not to annoy him, and he was already very much angry.” “No, you’re really getting it wrong. He was not a bit angry, even when I challenged him with that last question. He was not in the least annoyed, he only wanted us to think he was. Before he went out he gave a strange smile, do you know what that smile meant?” “Please tell me.” “ ‘They think I’m angry, fools.’ ” “Was that last word really in that smile?” “I don’t care, but he thought us fools.” “I hate people reminding me of who I am. What do you think about the letter he brought, sir?” “I think of two things for now; one: the deceased knew what was coming to him so he wrote a note stating the summons of his lawyer. Two: the deceased never wrote the note, it was written by the murderer to add more salt to the injury. We are left to find out who really wrote the note.” “In your first idea, why couldn’t the deceased call the lawyer on phone by himself instead of writing a boring note? And why did he hide the note under the gatekeeper’s pillow instead of giving it directly to him or instructing him verbally? He called you, I don’t see the reason he couldn’t have called his lawyer too. Please, tell me what is going on in this compound.” “That’s what we’re here to find out. And by tracing the subtle twitchings of the web, we might find the spider.” The police officer thought for a moment before asking, “Sir, is it possible for someone to confess to a crime, especially one that has to do with killing?” “Confession is advisable because sooner or later, the criminal would be caught.” “But some do get away with it.” “Some lucky ones, but in my own case—Never! As the person tries to cover his trails, he leaves more trails behind him. Take for example, you are walking at the sandy side of a beach, you looked behind you and sees your footprints plainly visible on the sands. You decide to clean them by rubbing the marks off. But you are ignorant of the fact that, the prints won’t go; instead of them to be decreasing, they in actual fact increase. As you try to wipe out the visibility of the prints with your hands, you create another print with your palms and toes. That logic is applicable to crime too. You know, criminals are sometimes drawn to the scene of their crimes, and in doing so, they thwart their chances of escape.” “Can that happen in this case?” “I don’t think so, this is another ball game entirely, the crime was committed outside, and that makes it complicated.” “How is that?”

CupidsRisk, Episode 29

29: A Dangerous Invitation ...By Atala Wala Wala  The car pulled up just outside the bank, and Iphey stepped out, anxiously glancing at her watch again. The window on her side slid down, and Chinedu peered through it. “Are you sure you'll be OK? I hope your boss won't eat you alive for this,” he asked. “I will be a few minutes late, but I should be fine; I'll find an excuse that will work. At least, as far as I know, there's no meeting that I need to be present at.” Iphey still wondered whether Funmi had a nasty shock waiting for her when she got back, but that was something she could worry about later. Right now, she felt so happy at the prospect at starting something really solid with Chinedu that everything else paled in comparison. “OK. Oh - before I forget - can I get your number? You can be sure that I have no intention of deleting it this time - but I'll make up a song with the numbers in it, just in case I lose the phone,” he joked. Iphey laughed as she gave it to him. “Please call me, and let's set something up.” Chinedu smiled back. “Yes, let's see if we can start afresh. Actually, I just remembered that you don't have your own transport to get back. How about we kill  two  birds  with  one  stone?  I  can  pick  you  up  this  evening,  we  can  go somewhere nice and then I can drop you off at home.” “That sounds like a great idea.”   “Yes, I thought so too. OK, I'll see you later.” He waved at her, and watched admiringly as she walked towards the bank entrance. Then the window slid back up, the engine revved and the car took off towards his office. **** As he drove, Chinedu was lost in thought. He really wanted to make things work with Iphey, and he was glad that he had this chance... but he recalled her unease about his history as an armed robber. “Sometimes, I wonder why I had to go and say that. Perhaps things would have been better if I had kept this close to my chest,” he mused. The more he thought about it, the more he felt it would be better to make a clean breast of things and tell her what had happened in his earlier years... Chinedu and his four younger siblings were had grown up in Ajegunle, where their father worked as a clerk in an office and their mum sold provisions in a small store. But it was not a happy marriage; the money both their parents brought in was rarely ever enough to feed them all, so there were always rows over why the children did not have school uniforms and books, or when the rent was going to be paid so that the landlord would stop harassing them. Chinedu remembered those rows with a shudder; they were violent, searing affairs that left him with ugly memories. He also remembered his father often saying to him and his siblings in a bitter voice: “See the suffering that being poor can bring. If you know what is good for you, make sure you study well so that you can get a good job and live in a big house, not this..” gesturing around their cramped one-bedroom apartment. So he coped in his own way by immersing himself in his studies; perhaps he could spirit them away from this miserable existence if he became a doctor, or an engineer. Fortunately for him, his ability matched his desire, and he excelled at school, so it looked like his hopes might become reality. Unfortunately, at the end of his second to last year in secondary school, his parents separated. His father was tired of being belittled by his wife and left to stay with another woman he had been having an affair with; his mother was only too glad to see him go, as it would mean an end to the endless beatings and abuse. But that meant that the burden of looking after the five of them weighed even more heavily on her, and in the end, this meant that Chinedu had to help to augment the family income by acting as an Alabaru, a load porter at the local market. Needless to say, this meant an end to his studies. Chinedu recalled his time at the market with mixed feelings. He missed going to school; in addition, the work was hard and competition for customers was fierce. However, he soon realised that the place was alive in a way that he had never  experienced  as  an  ordinary market-goer. There was  always  something going on; in addition, there was a whole underside to life in the area that he had never realised existed until he started hearing stories from the sellers and other regulars who frequented the place. He soon made two friends, Polycarp and Gbenro. Polycarp was a friendly, rather quiet boy who had also been working at the market as a porter for two years. But Chinedu was more more drawn to Gbenro, a much livelier person who always seemed to have a ready jest on his lips. One of the area boys, Gbenro was his nickname, no one seemed to know his real names. Chinedu also noticed that although Gbenro was not much older than him and did not always do any specific job with the area boys, he always seemed to have a good deal to spend. His curiosity pestered him to find out more; he still longed to return to school, but the meagre tips he got from his work meant that this would be a long time coming. “So Gbenro, how you come get all dis money wey you dey spend yanfu-yanfu for here, now? No be only this area boy work you dey do here?” he asked one day, after his curiosity would give him peace no longer. “Ah, bro... dat one na special ting...” Gbenro looked shifty all of a sudden. “I fit tell you, but...” “But wetin?” Impatience joined curiosity in prodding him. Chinedu gave a deep sigh. This was the moment he often replayed in his head; the moment his life took a dramatic turn, as a sequence of events began to unfold. It turned out that Gbenro, who ran errands for a gang of armed robbers in the area, had actually been waiting for an opportunity to recruit him to be a part  of  the  gang.  So  Chinedu  started out  as  an  errand  boy,  passing  along information; due to his popularity and having grown up in the area, he knew almost everyone. With time, he graduated to being a participant in the actual robberies, either as a lookout or driver. It had all been part of the excitement of being a teenager, he played cops and robbers and saved some money for his GCE exam. He assuaged any lingering doubts by thinking that no one was being hurt. Until the day everything went horribly, horribly wrong. 30: Operation gone wrong...by Atala Wala Wala.  It was the evening of what had been a dull and rainy day. Chinedu was waiting in a room with two other men; he had been asked to 'report for duty', as an operation was scheduled for this night. He was nervous, because unlike the past few operations, he had not been given any details. While he waited, he tried to pry information from the other two men. Serubawon, tough and surly, ignored him  altogether;  Chancer,  quiet  and  tense,  told  him to wait for their leader, Dabaru, to come - he would tell him everything. Chinedu was edgy because the people he was more familiar with, Gbenro and a few others, were not there. About an hour later, the door opened, and Dabaru entered, followed by Okey, another member of the gang. Dabaru was a tall, rangy man who had the air of someone  scenting  for  danger  around  him.  He  had  been  involved  in  armed robbery for over five years; more than once, his sharp instincts had helped him evade capture. He called them all to gather round so that he could explain the night's operation. “We are going to this address in Lekki tonight. I hear that someone there is keeping some money there this night.” He stared fiercely at one of the other boys, “Okey, you know the place, right? The place I showed you when we were driving in the area the other day.” Chinedu was puzzled. “Is Okey driving tonight?” he asked. Dabaru turned to him and smiled. “Yes, Okey is driving instead of you. I think it's time that you took part in a actual operation.” He turned back to the others and continued explaining details of the operation, but Chinedu's mind was elsewhere. He knew that this day would come one day, but he hadn't thought that it would come so soon. His heart beat faster as he thought of what would happen. He had gone on shooting practice sessions with the gang before, but practice was one thing; real life was something else. Eventually, Dabaru finished with the explanations and told them all to get into the car waiting outside; the guns they needed were already in the boot. As Chinedu passed him, he put his hand on his shoulder and said “We will make six million naira from this operation; I know you will not disappoint. Just be strong like you were in the last operation.” Then he followed them out and entered the car, which promptly revved and sped off towards Lekki. Chinedu shook his head as he recalled how horribly wrong the operation had gone. His role had been to climb over the wall of the compound at the address, then threaten to shoot the compound guard if he did not open the gate for the rest of his colleagues. Unfortunately, the guard had panicked and run towards the house, raising the alarm. Chinedu had him in his sights; but he found that he could  not  bring  himself  to  pull  the  trigger.  He  stood  there,  sweating  and trembling, as the rest of the gang shouted at him to let them in. Suddenly, there was a gunshot, and he felt a sharp pain in his leg. The robbers heard the shot, and that was their cue to flee. Chinedu collapsed and as he lay on the ground, blood seeping through his jeans, he heard the wail of sirens in the distance growing louder. He woke up the next day at Apongbon. Five days later, the police doctor had bandaged the flesh wound on his leg inflicted by the house owner's pistol but the pain in his heart went deeper. While his answers to the interrogations had saved him some beating, he had been charged for armed robbery. His mother had visited once but there was nothing she or anyone could do. He was not up for bail and the police were were almost ready to transfer him to Kirikiri. He was sitting quietly while the other inmates raved and ranted, when a couple of prison guards approached his cell and unlocked it. The prisoners began to chant at the guards, but they glared fiercely back and pointed to Chinedu. “You... come with us. Oga wants to see you.” Which oga, and why does he want to see me? Chinedu wondered, as they walked down the dark corridors that led to the prison‟s chief superintendent‟s office. The guards knocked and entered. Two men were sitting at the table; one was dressed in uniform - Chinedu guessed that he was the superintendent - and the other was tall, dark and wore an expensive babanriga. “Is that the boy?” the tall man asked, pointing at Chinedu. “Yes, sah,” one of the guards replied. “Hmm...” The man stroked his chin for a while, and then he spoke. “You... you were brought in from an armed robbery, right?” others and continued explaining details of the operation, but Chinedu's mind was elsewhere. He knew that this day would come one day, but he hadn't thought that it would come so soon. His heart beat faster as he thought of what would happen. He had gone on shooting practice sessions with the gang before, but practice was one thing; real life was something else. Eventually, Dabaru finished with the explanations and told them all to get into the car waiting outside; the guns they needed were already in the boot. As Chinedu passed him, he put his hand on his shoulder and said “We will make six million naira from this operation; I know you will not disappoint. Just be strong like you were in the last operation.” Then he followed them out and entered the car, which promptly revved and sped off towards Lekki. Chinedu shook his head as he recalled how horribly wrong the operation had gone. His role had been to climb over the wall of the compound at the address, then threaten to shoot the compound guard if he did not open the gate for the rest of his colleagues. Unfortunately, the guard had panicked and run towards the house, raising the alarm. Chinedu had him in his sights; but he found that he could  not  bring  himself  to  pull  the  trigger.  He  stood  there,  sweating  and trembling, as the rest of the gang shouted at him to let them in. Suddenly, there was a gunshot, and he felt a sharp pain in his leg. The robbers heard the shot, and that was their cue to flee. Chinedu collapsed and as he lay on the ground, blood seeping through his jeans, he heard the wail of sirens in the distance growing louder. He woke up the next day at Apongbon. Five days later, the police doctor had bandaged the flesh wound on his leg inflicted by the house owner's pistol but the pain in his heart went deeper. While his answers to the interrogations had saved him some beating, he had been charged for armed robbery. His mother had visited once but there was nothing she or anyone could do. He was not up for bail and the police were were almost ready to transfer him to Kirikiri. He was sitting quietly while the other inmates raved and ranted, when a couple of prison guards approached his cell and unlocked it. The prisoners began to chant at the guards, but they glared fiercely back and pointed to Chinedu. “You... come with us. Oga wants to see you.” Which oga, and why does he want to see me? Chinedu wondered, as they walked down the dark corridors that led to the prison‟s chief superintendent‟s office. The guards knocked and entered. Two men were sitting at the table; one was dressed in uniform - Chinedu guessed that he was the superintendent - and the other was tall, dark and wore an expensive babanriga. “Is that the boy?” the tall man asked, pointing at Chinedu. “Yes, sah,” one of the guards replied. “Hmm...” The man stroked his chin for a while, and then he spoke. “You... you were brought in from an armed robbery, right?”   Chinedu, staring in astonishment could only nod his head. “I am Alhaji Galadima,” the man continued. “I am here to talk about the gang that you were part of...” It  turned  out  that  the Alhaji,  who  was  a  police  officer,  was  looking  for information that would help him end the operations of Chinedu‟s former gang, who were still active in the area. On inquiring, he learnt of Chinedu who had been part of the gang, but was now in custody. Galadima realised after talking at length with Chinedu that he had no great loyalty to the gang members, as they had abandoned him the moment he had been caught, and had not contacted or been to see him since. Chinedu said he would co-operate with the police in supplying information. Galadima also saw from the conversation that Chinedu was quite an intelligent person, and soon teased out the circumstances that led to him joining the gang. His co-operation led to two members of the gang, Serubawon and Okey, being caught. It also meant that the Alhaji was able to arrange for him to be released sooner, and in addition, he volunteered to fund Chinedu‟s education to university level “because it would be a shame for such a fine young mind to go to waste.” Chinedu‟s eyes misted over as he remembered the Alhaji‟s benevolence, but he quickly wiped the wetness away, as he slowed down his car to park at his office.   *****************************   Please, click on our ads.

The Brand of Cain, Episode 28

By Larry Sun “I was not being a vigilante, that is one job I detest. I was returning from the minaret. Brother Daniel can testify to that, he saw me holding my Qur’an when I came to call him. That day was on a Saturday and I went to Tajjud vigil the night before, which was on a Friday.” “Now, I want you to answer this question truthfully.” “That I killed him? I have told you, I am not—” “Will you stop flapping your flatulent mouth and let me finish?” Lot roared angrily. The boy became mute.  “When you saw the body, did you come across any weapon—any gun?” Hakeem shook his head. “Are you sure?” He nodded, beads of sweat had begun to form on his nose. “Before seeing the body, did you meet anybody on your way?”  He spoke up this time, “I met many people, most of them were returning from church, but I did not see anybody when I turned into this street. The street was as quiet as a Shehu’s grave.” “What about when you were going to Daniel’s, did you meet anybody?” “I met nobody, but I felt the spirit of the dead man following behind me. It made me burst into a run with fear.” “Okay, thank you, but before you go, how old are you exactly?” “I will be fifteen by November twenty-eighth.” “What’s your full name?” “My name is Ciroma Hakeem Musa and I am not a terrorist.” The reply surprised the detective, “Who says you are?” Hakeem spread his hands, “That is the idea. Most people believe every Muslim is a terrorist.” “Then you’re a devout Muslim, right?” “A faithful believer in Allah and Prophet Mohammed, salla Allah alaihi wa sallam. I have never gone on a pilgrimage to Mecca, but I pray to Allah five times daily and I do not eat pork.” “Are you from the North?” “I am precisely a Fulani but my parents work here in Lagos. My mother sells Tuwo Shinkafa at the car-park and my father imports cattle from Kaduna to sell here in Lagos.” “You’re a very smart and intelligent boy, I like you.” The boy’s face brightened up like a Christmas light in a dark alley, “SubhanAllah. Allah be exalted.” Lot smiled, “I want you to pray to your Allah or Mohammed to give us the wisdom to catch the murderer. Will you do that for us, please?” “Detective Abdullot and Brother Abduldaniel, have faith in the Qur’an, first paragraph, book four.” “Care to tell us what it says, Imam Musa?” Daniel asked. “The feasts were brought among the unbelieving infidels and no longer were they unbelieving.” The boy quoted. “You see, all you need is faith and Allah will help you.” “Do your parents know how intelligent you are, Hakeem?” Daniel said to Hakeem, the boy’s foibles he had always been finding charming. Hakeem shrugged, “I doubt it, my father spends more time with his cattle than with me and my mother is always flirting with cab-drivers at the park. They are both illiterates, of course.” “Thank you, Hakeem,” Lot said, “You can go now.” He pressed the ‘Stop’ button on the recorder. The boy rose and bowed to the two men, and then he walked out like someone who had just rescued a drowning dog in the presence of an impressed crowd. Lot turned to Daniel and asked, “What do you think?” Daniel smiled, “That boy is funny and intelligent. He’s definitely one of those boys who do not mind exchanging banters with anybody they come across. And he speaks English almost perfectly. I mean he never uses contractions. Never ‘I’m’ or ‘you’re’ but always ‘I am’ or ‘you are’.” “I know what contractions are,” Lot snapped at him, “Was he lying when he was explaining how he came across the body?” “If that boy was lying, you would have known, sir. He spoke everything he knew.” A bee buzzed past them and banged its face against the wall. “The gun was taken away by the murderer.” Though Lot spoke out, he actually spoke to himself. “Mr. Martins might have committed suicide.” Lot cast a sharp annoyed look at Daniel and said, “Have I got to tell you thirty-six times, and then again thirty-six that he was murdered? Where were you when the Almighty passed out brains?” “I’m sorry, sir. Who are we questioning this time?” “The gatekeeper, of course.” Lot answered. “Wait a minute, Hakeem said the gatekeeper was already awake when you knocked on the gate, was that true?” “It seemed so.” “Then he might have seen or heard something.” “Or he might know how the body reached the gate.”                                     FOURTEEN The name ‘Eze’ meant ‘King’ to Chima, and he always acknowledged himself as a person of royal status, though he was a gatekeeper most of his life and had not even a chieftaincy lineage. He was dressed in his native Igbo attire; a red cap rested smugly on his head and a pair of black pointed shoes covered his feet. He sat on a chair as he entered the interrogation room. Detective Lot watched him closely and coughed. He picked up the recorder and pressed the rewind button for a second or two, then he pressed the ‘Record’ button and began: “What is your name, sir?” said Lot, calling upon all his powers of self-control to force the last of these five words through the barrier of his teeth. He believed Chima was an older man who deserved no much of a respect from him. “John Eze Chima.” “Can you please tell us about yourself, Mr. Chima?” “I have nothing much to tell; I’m an easy-going man and I don’t cause trouble.” Eze said flatly. “Is that all you’re going to say?” “What else do you want me to say? I’m in perpendicular a man who doesn’t speak much about himself.” Lot leaned back in his chair and looked at the old man opposite him intently. He could only see a calm but dangerous expression in the man’s eyes. “Sir, how old are you?” Lot asked. “I can’t remember, but I celebrated my eleventh birthday when Nigeria got her independence.” Lot made a swift calculation in his mind, “Then you’re sixty years old.” “Thou hast said.” The detective slapped his forehead and groaned, the man was succeeding in getting on his nerves, he suppressed his anger. It was like gulping a mouthful of bile. “How long have you been working for the deceased?” The old man lapsed into memory, “About half a decade now, I think.” “Your relationship with the deceased, was it what one could call amiable, as in friendly?” Eze chuckled, rivers of wrinkles flowing down the corners of his eyes and mouth. “That’s quite on the contrary. No one had a friendly relationship with Cain, except his lawyer, of course.” “Now that he’s gone, do you miss him?” “No, I don’t. I mourn his death though, but not the closing of his big mouth. He was as cruel and headstrong as an allegory on the banks of Nile. Nobody would miss a man who had visited the pearly gates with a CV that would make Saint Peter call for the celestial security guards to bundle him straight to hell.” The detective shifted in his seat to a more comfortable position. “Mr. Chima, let’s talk about that gun you possess. How did you come about the old rifle?” “It’s my war souvenir.” “Excuse me?” “Biafra,” Eze said, pausing to scratch his groin.”It was in the late sixties when I was still young and handsome,” he laughed, “I was about eighteen or nineteen years old when the war broke out. I was picked to join the army against my wish, then I was given an oversized uniform with a gun and sent to the warfront to face death—there was no shooting training performed, no combatant training, nothing. Yet, I killed about six dozen enemies with that gun, can you believe that? The more I killed, the braver I became. It was a sheer miracle that I was not killed in that war, I didn’t even sustain a scratch. Many of my colleagues, older and younger, were unlucky and got killed, some got their limbs blown away, some bodies could not even be identified because they were silly enough to face killing tanks with pistols and hunters’ guns.” He smiled as a remembrance occurred to him. “There was time during the war when we were suddenly attacked with tanks, it was just like God’s attack on Sodom and Glocca Morra from the pages of the Old Tentacle, as brave as I was, I immediately turned and ran like hell, dripping with inspiration. I wasn’t turning chicken, and I wasn’t trying to be a superman either, I was just using my head for once. Those who fight and run away live to fight another day. So I ran, a bullet richshawed a tree and almost hit me in the head. There are times when you don’t need a priest to tell you that it isn’t sensible to take on a tank with your gun, because if you do, you’ll be standing there holding your gun and looking at the hole the tank just created in your belly. I think that was what really happened in the case of some of my silly mates. “After the war, I kept my gun as a souvenir; its sight will always remind me of my youth, the days when men were still men.” He smiled, “I don’t think you can reprehend the meaning of what I’m saying.” After listening patiently to the gatekeeper’s tale, Lot asked, “Have you ever shot the gun after the war?” “Yes, twice. I shot a bullet in 1988 and another in about a decade and a half later.” “What war were you fighting then?” “No be war. I shoot the bullets up to the heavens because of the sound, it makes the memories of the Biafra fresh in my brain.” “Did you shoot any recently?” “No.” “Mr. Chima, do you have a family, any wife or child?” “I lost my wife in 1992, she died of tuberculosis and Chidi, my only son, died in 2002. He was one of the victims of that bomb explosion at the cantonment. My daughter, too, died at childbirth.” “Accept my condolence, sir.” Lot said dryly. Chima smiled, “Many years ago, I would have appreciated your sympathy, but now, Amaka, Angela and Chidi are nothing but old memories to me.” “We are investigating the death of Mr. Martins and I believe you are going to help us on the case. You are going to help, right?” “Sure, why not? If he was killed, then the person who did it has done many people a great favour, yet, he shouldn’t have taken the law in his own hands. If I may say, I don’t even believe Cain was killed.” “Can you please recount to me what happened on the night of the seventh?” The old man began to speak his words in orderly sequence as if he had composed the speech on paper, then memorized and possibly rehearsed it. “It was about ten-thirty in the night when I heard the sound of a car engine,” he began, “I went to the garage and saw Cain and the driver in a jeep, of all the cars in the garage, Cain had always preferred to go out in a jeep.” “Where were they going?” “I have no idea, nobody told me. Cain only ordered me to open the gate, which I obediently did; he was my boss.” “And the next morning Cain was found dead?” “No, something else happened before that.” “What happened?” “At exactly half past twelve that night, Oga drove back inside alone.” Daniel, who had been silently listening to the two men was surprised, “Are you sure about that, sir?” “Positive,” replied Eze Chima, “Cain came back that night without the driver. When I opened the gate and saw only Cain in the jeep I immediately sensed that something fishy was going on—honestly, I thought Cain had killed Richard and dumped his body somewhere before coming back. You see, Cain and his driver were like cat and mouse, so the thought that Cain had killed Richard was not really a surprising one to me. What really baffled me was seeing Cain lying dead outside, because I locked the gate from within when Cain drove back inside, and I put the keys under my pillow. Nobody could have taken it without my knowledge.” “Maybe there were the duplicates of the keys.” Lot said. ************************************ Please, click on...

CupidsRisk,Episode 18

27: I'm sorry but YOU DID WHAT?! ...by La-Pimpette featuring F There he was. The man who had refused to call. The man who had...

The Brand of Cain, Episode 27

By Larry Sun “Why not?” “You would have been wasting your time, sir. Mrs. Martins was sleeping in her room when the whole thing started.” “Remember, I...

CupidsRisk, Episode 17

25: Time to move on? ....by Spesh Ngozi still didn‟t get it! It had been two weeks and yet, each time she came back to it...

The Brand of Cain, Episode 26

By Larry Sun “With enough hard work and dedication, you’ll surely see it through. Don’t see your being a policeman as a curse. Do you...

Everything around us that we call life was made by people just like you. So, build a life don't live one.

Powered by : Get It Right With Shittu

Click to get more motivational quotes

Trending

Heartstrings, Episode 6

By Mr Ben “You are a nice person. Don’t let them take you for granted.” He halted at his door and faced them, “Thank you for your concern. Have a good night ladies.” “Good night doctor,” they sighed heavily and returned to their flat. Chinyere looked him up and down, folded her arms across her chest and stood in front of him like a stumbling block. “Chinyere, Chinyere, Chinyere!” he waved a pointed finger at her. She pursed her lips, “I am only looking out for you.” “Who made you my guardian angel or my bodyguard?” his tone of voice rose a notch. She grimaced. She didn’t like the fact that he didn’t appreciate her gesture of care. He looked up at her, “I am old enough to be your father.” “You are not my father,” she hissed and stepped backwards. He heaved a sigh of distress, “Regardless… look young woman; I know you like me…” She lowered her gaze. She had fallen for him since he moved into the compound but, he had always related with her like a child. She had hoped that he would see her like a grown woman and learn to love her the way she loved him. “Look… you are a good girl… but, I cannot go out with you,” he searched her pale face. She bit at her lower lip. His words wounded her pining heart. “I am not a pedophile,” he hoped he would be able to get through to her that night. She looked into his honey coloured eyes, “I know that. It doesn’t matter what people might think… it is ‘you’ and ‘me’ that matters,” her eyes pleaded for understanding. He raised his head and looked upwards. Why do teenagers have such thick skulls? Nothing ever got through to them. Lord Jesus help me out here. She is not listening to me. “Listen to me,” he gave her a long steady look, “I don’t love you, I cannot love you and I will never ever love you the way you want me to.” Colour drained from her face. Wet dark eyes probed honey coloured firm ones. She gulped spittle, turned around and fled. “Chinyere!” he took some steps forward, and then exhaled loudly. He ran his fingers through his brown cropped curly hair and stifled a yawn. He backed up and pressed the door bell. He saw Misi standing at the doorway clad in a knee length straight brown dress with a pink bow at the waist line. The colour blended with her chocolate brown skin, making her look fresh, clean and desirable. Her dark brown shoulder length hair was curled at the tip, giving her a stylish look. “Welcome…” she felt uncomfortable under his gentle scrutiny. There was a gleam in his honey coloured eyes as he stared at her. “Evening, how are you doing?” he stepped into the apartment. “Fine,” she closed the door and followed him into the sitting room. “Evening everyone,” he met his sister and the Philips watching the television. “Welcome,” Eno winked at him. “Evening doctor,” Mr. and Mrs. Philips greeted him. “I hope there is food in this house,” he directed his gaze at his sister. “Yes, I will set the dining,” Misi responded. “Good, thanks,”he glanced at her and headed for his bedroom. She hurried into the kitchen and brought out his bowl of ogbonna soup and a plate of semovita out of the microwave. She and Eno had made soup and stew that evening. She set it on a tray and carried it to the dining. She returned to the kitchen and brought out a pack of fruit juice from the refrigerator and picked a clean glass cup in the cupboard. She arranged it on the dining and dashed back to the kitchen. She filled an empty plastic bowl with water and reached out for one of the napkins hanging on the window. She took it to the dining table and joined Eno on the settee. She and Eno had hit it off that day. She found out that she worked at Wazobia radio station and coincidentally, they needed an accountant. Eno called her boss that noon and an interview date was scheduled for her. She believed that she would get the job. God had turned things around for her family and everything was working out for their good. She noticed when the doctor started eating. He was in his boxers and a white singlet. His fair skin made him to look like a half-caste. She wondered if his curly hair was natural or in perm. There were times when she was tempted to run her fingers through it. How will it feel like? She cleared her head. It wouldn’t be wise to develop feelings for someone that had decided to help her family with no strings attached. Relationship was the last thing on her mind anyway. Her last boyfriend had broken up with her when he got an opportunity to travel out of the country. He didn’t want a long distance relationship and he wasn’t ready to get married. Her family situation had also killed any desire to get involve with someone else. She might be ready to date again once they were back on their feet. She saw him leave the room. He must have finished eating. She got up and walked to the dining. She cleared the table and carried the empty dishes into the kitchen. xxxxxx Eno left everyone in the sitting room and went to one of the guest rooms to sleep. She had told Misi to be ready early the next morning so that she could be interviewed by her boss and hopefully gain employment at the Radio Station. She liked the girl, despite her family’s financial condition; there was still an air of affluence about her. She had a calm and peaceful aura. It had been a while since she had met someone who was so full of gratitude and had a firm faith in God. If she was in her shoes, she wasn’t sure how she would have reacted or coped. The Philips had stood the test of time. They were an encouragement to all that God never failed. Misi came in and joined her on the bed. Her parents and the doctor were still in the sitting room watching the news. She needed to wake up early the next day. She couldn’t afford to sleep late and risk waking up late in the morning. In a minute or two, they were both fast asleep. Bassey called Tomisin aside and they spoke in low tones. His wife discerned that they wanted privacy. She bid them good night and left the room. “I have secured an accommodation for you and your family.” Tomisin gaped in surprise. He prayed within that God would bless the young man. The Lord had used a perfect stranger to rescue them when friends and family turned their backs on them. “It is a two bedroom apartment right here in Ikeja.” He clasped his hands together, “Thank you, thank you so much.” “You are welcome sir.” “God will bless you,” his eyes glistered with tears. “Amen. My parents and siblings donated furniture, electronics, kitchen utensils, food stuff, provisions, and a host of other things.” “Wow!” his excited gaze held the younger man’s happy ones. “You can move in tomorrow if you like.” “That is good news, thank you so much.” “I am happy to be used by the Lord to help you and your family… just thank God.” He nodded in appreciation. He couldn’t stop the tears from flowing. His heart expanded with joy, “God will bless you and your family beyond your wildest dreams.” “Amen! Amen…” Tomisin looked heavenwards, “Thank you so much Jesus. Oh God thank you.” Bassey excused himself and went into his room. He would speak to his parents about how they could integrate Mr. and Mrs. Philips in their work force. They had an outlet in Ikeja. The couple could work there and spend less on transportation. His brother had not given him feedback concerning vacancy in his place of work. He needed to get Misi a good job too. He had an accountant already in his clinic. If not, he would have employed her. He lay on the bed and soon drifted off to sleep. His dreams were completely taken over by the Philips’ daughter. She was singing and dancing. ******************************************** Stay connected for another fresh episode, click on our ads and follow us on facebook, twitter and instagram.

CupidsRisk, Episode 33

Dabaru! His nightmare was back ....by Aedeeaee “Shit,” Chinedu said when the converstion with Habib ended. If his hands were not on the steering wheel,...

Nigerian Writer,Teju Cole Begins Nationwide Tour in the U.S

Nigerian writer and one time Germany's International Literary Prize winner, Teju Cole has concluded plans to begin a nationwide tour in the U.S and...

Bla Bla Bla

'Hey sweetie, when you get on stage, just introduce yourself and go ahead with your presentation, okay?'I admonished. My little nephew looked at me and...

Longing Thought

To Adedayo Adeyemi Agarau Do you remember Sade? Do you remember yesterday we flew kite at the cloudy street of Ibadan? Do you remember how I...

Gov Obaseki Celebrates Poets, Writers on World Poetry Day

The Governor of Edo State, Mr. Godwin Obaseki, has commended poets and writers for serving as the mirror of the society and amplifying beliefs,...

Agbe (Woodcock)    

                                      Reviewer: Yamilenu Bamgboye Release Date: March 15, 2018 Genre: Spoken Word Poetry Artiste: Yusuf Balogun Gemini   It’s not unusual for people in this part of the world to take so much delight in lip service and worse off, celebrate dead people who were probably their contemporaries and legends that gave their all for the advancement of one humanitarian course or the other with vain words just because. It is bad enough to see these legends toil with so much passion in their life time for the things they believe without being celebrated but, isn’t it excruciatingly painful to their loved ones when they are laced with so much hypocrisy that could even make the dead cringe and perhaps, spin in their graves? The celebration of epicals isn’t restricted to formal recognition by some organised persons or groups or being placed on some elevated platform before a multitude, nah! It involves acceptance, sincere words of appreciation and handouts of few kobo when their lives depend on it like Enebeli Elebuwa, OJB Jezreel (before Rotimi Amaechi came to his rescue), Olumide Bakare and even Dagrin (according to a reliable source). No wonder Munachi Obiekwe died without asking for help but couldn’t stop the usual hypocritical accolades at his burial. With this consciousness, Yusuf Balogun Gemini, a young scholar and a budding poet refuses to be part of the bandwagon of a bunch of hypocrites involved in such practices with the sleight of hand. Instead, he decides to document the exploits of a legend--Pa Akinwunmi Isola--for today, tomorrow and maybe, forever by mourning his exist. Until his death on February 17, 2018 in Ibadan, Oyo State after an age-related illness, he was a professor of Yoruba at the prestigious Obafemi Awolowo University and a visiting professor at the University of Georgia, U.S.A. In year 2000, in recognition of his efforts and dream of making Yoruba the language of instruction in schools, he was given the National Merit Award and the Fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Letters. His notable works before he broke into broadcasting and established his own production company that has turned a number of his subsequent plays into television drama and films include Efunsetan Aniwura, his first play in his undergraduate days at the University of Ibadan in 1961 and O leku in 1986 (Wikipedia). In 1997, Uncle TK (Tunde Kelani) of Mainframe Productions adapted the novel into a television drama or feature movie thus, giving fresh breath to the novel and unconsciously sparking off the revival of certain practices like the fashion trend of the 1970s. Agbe translated as woodcock in English is a kind of bird in the genus Scolopax of the family Scolopacidae. Simply put, it’s a brown bird with a long straight beak, short legs and a short tail, hunted for food or sport (Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary). Being a popular gamebird, the rarity of this specie is felt due to ‘overhunting’ and it is this rarity that really affords Gemini the opportunity to depict Pa Akinwunmi Isola as agbe-- that uncommon specie of legend that has been hunted by iku-- death. In this igbala whose English equivalent is dirge: a sorrowful or lament for the dead, Gemini identifies himself with the biggest dream of the icon (to see Yoruba language become the language of instruction in schools in the South-West) especially now that he has become engrossed in documenting and reviving Yoruba with poetry dipped in ancient tales, incantations, myths, adages, idioms and analogies. As customary of his poems and many Yoruba speakers that make reference to things that connect to certain metaphysical elements, he opens by paying homage to God (Edumare), the creator of all things and many lesser beings with different ranks and file in the spiritual realm: Ogun (the god of iron), Esu laalu (the Devil or Satan) and Awon Iya (the ethereal motherhood): Mo se ba Edumare, atiwaye ojo, atiwo oorun, iba kutukutu awo owuro, ganrin ganrin awo osan gangan, wirin wirin awo oru, a ti okuku su wi, awo oganjo, Iba Elewu Ide, Iba Elewu ala, Iba irawo sa sa n be lehin f'osupa, Afefelegelege - awo isalu aye, Efuufu, awo isalu Oorun, Iba Ajagunmole oluwo ode Orun, Iba Aromoganyin onibode aye oun Orun, Iba Awonamaja babalawo tii komo ni IFA oju Orun, Iba Esu laalu, Iba eyin iya mi, Afinju eye ti n je loju oloko, afinju eye ti n fiye sapa ti n fiko seyin, iba ile otete lanbua, Agbohun maa fo, abiyamo tooto, Iba Ogun, yankan bi ogbe, Iba otarigidi ti n se yeye Ogun, iba omobowu oun Ewiri maje, Iba IJA, iba osoosi ode mata, Iba Olutasin tokotoko bo Ogun, Iba ope ti a n tidi n be, tii n tori gbe ni. Aba ti alagemo ba da l'oosa n GBA, Oro ti akuwarapa ba so, ode Orun lo ti wa. In case you wonder why he has to go that way every other time, he says in his poem Ipado: the dangers of walking in an unsafe zone that discussions involving celestial powers usually have a repercussion when one shuns or undermines their terrestrial weaponry: Ore wa, ohun kekere ma ko ni ipa Amori. Oun oju agba rii loke oun lo je o so akobi omo re ni Olaniyonu. Sugbon Aja suwon deyin Agbo suwon roro Aja o ni roro Ka rele lo magbo wa bo Eegun ile baba eni. Opuro n gbin paki, Oniwayo n gbin Ila. Awon akumamoojudi eda po lo jantirere loke Epe. Gbi le n gbo, e mo ibi ti ibon ti n ro. And after his lament on the unfairness of iku-- death who hunted Pa Akinwunmi Isola at the age of 78 like a hunter would hunt agbe (woodcock), he ends with an incantation to ward him off his trail: Awon agba ti ni n pe bi mope n se pe laye, n dagba dogbo n o fi omo ewu ro ori. Iku, maa to mi wa, ota mi ni o mu lo. Won ni, Kii ma so pe, Okete bayii niwa re, o ba IFA mu le, O da IFA, Okete bayii niwa re.   Otente, a o leke won, bi igba ba wodo, a le tente, otente a o leke won. Alasuwada, parada! Ojo ti mo da ko i pe, Ewe iyeye, igba ni... If, however, this constant practice of his (incantations and paying homage to celestial powers) wants to deter you in a way from becoming a language advocate like him and many others, not too worry. Just focus on the peripheral and let your words and referents be limited to your immediate environment and the world you know. Nevertheless, Gemini has done it again and this time, it’s simply for posterity. Do well to download and enjoy Yoruba poetry at its peak. Click here to...

Hey– Another Series of Toothless Panther?

By Yusuf Balagun Gemini For quite a while, I have stopped watching Yoruba movies or Nigerian movies generally, popularly regarded as Nollywood. It's undeniable that...