‘I thought England was this ‘‘better life’’ thing ’, Theresa Lola:Poet  

By Yamilenu Bamgboye Some years ago, Professor Ahmed Yerima argued very vehemently that poetry enjoys more social favours than drama and other genres. At first, that sounded too paradoxical to contain any element of reality. Today, considering how much spoken word poetry has begun to thrive in Nigeria and environs, I’m beginning to have a rethink. Poetry writing to some is a craft that is consciously learnt and developed but to some, it’s a talent that’s soaked in so much ability to project the thoughts that run wild in their minds. For masters like Folu Agoi, Niyi Osundare, Eriata Oribhabor, Romeo Oriogun, Chukwumerije, Fr33zing Paul and a host of others, poetry writing flows from within with so much secretion from the ‘gland’ that produces muse such that they have a hard time containing their thoughts else, they burst open. Lol! Theresa Lola (23) is fortunate to belong to that category. She is a fast rising poet whose exploits are sung like Davido’s hit tracks on different platforms in England including the prestigious BBC Radio 3 programme The Verb, Gal- dem Magazine, Brittle Paper, Girl Got Talent, Litro Magazine, etc. When we caught up with her at the 2017 Lagos International Poetry Festival, she was kind enough to let us into her world, her challenges when she moved to England, the awards she has won and her future plans as a writer. Do have fun reading Hi Lola, could you introduce yourself very briefly? My name is Theresa LOla (with stress on the first syllable). LOla or LoLA (with stress on the second syllable as typical of its etymology and meaning)? Whichever one, (laughs). Nigerians say LoLA which is why I like to hear it. And I am a poet, I am a writer, a workshop facilitator. I do many things though. With this Cockney accent of yours, I’m pushed to ask if you were born here. Of course I was born here. I lived in Nigeria till I was about thirteen. So, I left Nigeria at thirteen to be with my family. Let’s talk about poetry, how did it start? Poetry actually started here in Nigeria. Uhmm... so I loved reading, it was always, you know, compulsory in my house to read a book everyday. So, we had to read, we had to feedback the story to my mum because she loved reading. I loved reading so naturally, I wanted to recreate my own stories. So I started writing short stories, uhm... I started writing scripts just for fun. And while I was in secondary school, we  went on a school trip to Lagos Poetry Festival. I met some poets there and I was like poets seem like cool people and I just started writing poetry. In the university, what course was it? In the university, I studied Accounting and Finance because at a time, though I love poetry, I was like how do I make a living off poetry? So, I did the typical Nigerian   degree and I studied Accounting instead. I still do work as an accountant part-time uhmm... but poetry does add up. So, do you live off it? Yes, it is part of my income currently. But not hundred percent, right? Not hundred percent because I still choose to work part-time as an accountant. I still like to have that balance. Mentally, I’m a full-time poet but I like to do a lot of admin things. Does it mean you can’t do poetry full time? I can but I also like to be behind the scene. So, even if I’m not working in accounting, I’m probably working in publishing, working in editing. But if you mean poetry full-time as in performing, that’s not even my intention because I have so many other things in mind like programming events, poetry events and late show events. So, those are the things I have in mind. If that makes me a full-time poet, yes but I have other things I’ll like to do. You are from which of the states? I’m from Ogun State. I lived in Lagos but I’m from Ogun State. Have you won awards in poetry? Yes, in London. I was shortlisted for the Bridport Poetry Prize last year (2016) and I was shortlisted this year (2017). Uhmm... I was shortlisted for the London Magazine poetry prize, uhm...I was one of the winners of the Magic Words Seasons Poetry Prize, 2016. I also won the Hammer Tongue National Slam this year (2017). Did it come with some cash? Uhmm...when you are shortlisted, no. For winning, yes. I have to do a tour round the country so I get paid to talk. Yeah, you get some really good opportunities too. So, it’s good. Which poem of yours won you that award? It was three poems. The one I did about my grandfather How Time Is, one poem I did on post-traumatic stress disorder about soldiers coming back from war, and the one I did about women who are silenced in or whose quietness is mistaken for shyness when it’s actually they don’t want to speak about traumatic issues. But the main one that won it for me was the one I did about women. Can you say the lines or remember a bit of it? Honestly, no. Look, I was so nervous that day. I memorized it for that moment. After that, you know, it just disappeared. I used to memorize a lot but then, now especially as I’m writing my first book, you’re always thinking of how to write a poem so you try not to memorize a version of a poem. Ok, let’s talk about your book; what’s the title and when is it coming out? Oh gosh! I haven’t thought about it really. Before, I had Equilibrium as a tie up. I thought that’s going to change as the book is changing but the book... I’m just exploring death and the way in which it’s affected my life. So, I’m starting off talking about my grandfather’s death, issues surrounding it and a conversation about death and the many forms of death and things like that. Do I say it’s a project for your grandfather because you guys were close and you miss him? Uhmm...no. Yes, I was close to my grandfather. I lived with my grandparents while I was in Nigeria till I was thirteen but it’s about exploring death like I said. So, the book should be done by the end of this year (2017) or hopefully, next year (2018). Are you self-publishing or...? No. I’m going to get a good publisher in the process of discussing with different publishers. Apart from poems, do you do short stories or drama? Uhmm... not drama. The only other form of writing I have an interest in is screen writing. I love films. That’s what I started off doing. I started off writing scripts. I would pretend that I was in a film and I would write all sorts. Right now, I have a few scripts. I don’t know how many, I just kind of write and store them because I’m yet to prioritize them. What plans do you have for the scripts you write then? I definitely want to produce movies in the future. It’s just I don’t want to be a jack-of- all-trades-master-of-none. So, I kind of want to go one step at a time. Once I publish my first book which is a collection of poems, I will definitely move on to films and come back but my priority is to have the poetry collection first and then start thinking about how I can turn my scripts into films. Can you retell your early experiences in England? Like I said, I moved to England when I was thirteen and I remember really being excited like telling all my friends in boarding school that I’m moving to England. Back then, it was seen as such a big deal, everyone saw England as this ‘better life’ sort of thing. And it was fun at first but the first school I attended happened to be a racist school. Uhmm... and so, I ended up having to leave after a year because I experienced bullying, it was horrendous. Before that, I knew I was black but I lived in a country where everyone is black and race is not like a huge topic, do you get what I mean. So, there, I became really aware of it. But over time, I made new friends, met new people. I needed poetry because I was going through identity crisis and I was like why just being myself was a problem for other people. Like most of the guys who go over there and later come around to settle in Nigeria, do you have such plans? Hmmm... (laughs). I definitely want to come back but once in a while. I feel like I’ve lived enough here. I lived here for thirteen years so, I’ve paid my dues, you get what I mean. But I definitely do want to come back you know, more regularly and just try and build something here, maybe a publishing house in the future, just something you know. I really want to invest in the future of this country. So, no plans of you coming to live in Nigeria? No! I because I know why I’m in England and the reasons have always been the same. I think my destiny is in England (laughs). I enjoy living in England. I mean, it has its own downfalls but I know the opportunities I’ve been able to get. Where is home to you then? Home to me is family. Uhmm...by family, I mean like my mum, dad, siblings because they cross over the two homes that I have: Nigeria and England but I used to think home is Nigeria and all of that. But the longer I’ve lived there and the more I’m understanding identity, I don’t think home is a singular thing. I think it’s time to think home doesn’t have to be in one place but wherever all the major experiences in your life... all those places become home. It’s like a collation of things. So, when I think of home, I think of here (Nigeria) and England. So, all those things make home. I don’t think of it as a singular thing because I wouldn’t want to return if that makes sense. I feel like that’s in the past. I think of it through like the five senses, so uhmm...the things that you saw, the things you felt, the things you could hear. So, for me, when I think of home, I think of music, food which is more about tradition. I also think of home as where you are returning to when you’re overcoming trauma and sometimes, it’s both the same thing: when you’re experiencing or overcoming trauma. So, what do you hope to see around here in the festival? In the festival, I’m excited just to see communities, the merging of poets of different backgrounds: Nigerian, South African, etc. based in other countries and here in Nigeria just kind of sharing on the same stage and just being in one community. I’m looking forward to hearing many poets perform. I’ve never seen Wanna perform, I’ve never seen Titilope perform, Dami Ajayi, etc. So, I’m really excited to hear their works in person aside from via Skype or like searching them on the internet. I’m really excited to commune with other poets and the audience as well. I’m really into you know, getting to know the audience as well and not just the poets.

‘I see myself becoming a national icon in few years’, Shittu, convener of GIRWS

If we all could turn back the hand of time, apart from choosing to be better humans, it is very certain that one phrase would be on everyone’s lips and that is finding purpose on time. In yoruba, purpose is interpreted as ayanmo--that which we all, according to Gemini Yusuf Balogun in his poem Ori, search for when the race called life begins. Some get missing, maybe lost on the road in its search. Some get stranded, some get obstructed, some find it and lose it when influenced by things that don’t exist while some even die without finding it. For those who already found it, do you remember what it felt like when you did and how much relief that brought along? Do you remember how badly you wished you found it earlier? That’s exactly how it all went for Shittu Idowu Opeyemi, the convener of Get It Right With Shittu (GIRWS), a platform for the youth and everyone at large. As a young man who is so fortunate to find purpose quite early, he has a burning passion, which some may feel is quite burdensome, to help youth his age do the same for the essence of maximizing their potentials which would be the driver of the much desired change in our environments, our nation Nigeria and the world in general. In thisinterview with Yamilenu Bamgboye, he reveals how he found purpose, his relationship with girls and why he feels everyone has greatness in them. What birthed the GIRWS idea? Well, Get It Right With Shittu (GIRWS) actually started with me knowing my ability to motivate people and inspire them. That occurred to me while I was in secondary school. I loved to talk to people, even when we were having a particular discussion, I would find myself changing the discussion and trying to motivate them. Along the line, I realized it was in my DNA, that’s how GIRWS started. Eventually, when people come to me with their wrongs, I set it right for them. So, the platform is aimed at helping the young people of this generation reach their potentials, become leaders and achievers, live beautifully and abundantly. And I do this through heart-centred motivation and inspirational mentorship. How practically do you do this motivation? Some people will say the wealthiest place on earth is the grave yard which is true because there, you’ll see people with innovations that never saw the light of the day. People with skills and ideas that did not manifest or set in motion. I help people discover themselves. It is possible to take someone on a journey within themselves to places they can’t go by themselves that’s how I eventually do it. There are things people don’t know about themselves, their capabilities. Some don’t even know they have greatness in them so, I tell them they do and that’s my story, you have greatness in you and I help you to unveil it. That’s how I help them set their wrongs right. How has the journey been so far? Well, I feel achieved so far based on my effort and the people that have benefited from my mentorship and coaching. So, it’s growing anyway, it’s growing. We’re improving and it has kept me on my toes because me being a solution provider, I am meant to be an embodiment of knowledge to provide solutions or help people with their problems. So, it’s been impactful to me as well as a person and it’s been giving me a lot of exposure (taking me to certain places) so far. Do you hope to go into human resource management as time goes on? Not at all. Though I’m trying to do something that somehow goes in that line. When I was in the polytechnic, I studied Business Administration and Management but now, when I started the GIRWS, I intended doing a professional course that deals with human relations so, that’s what got me studying Industrial Relations and Personnel Management (IRPM) at Lagos State University. Get It Right With Shittu (GIRWS) seems to be an online platform. Is that what you intend it to be?  Eeerr... well, it is not just an online platform, I’m only running the online platform because I believe this is what I’m called for, I believe this is what I’m made for and I know the success of many people is anchored on my shoulders and that’s why I have to reach them. I’m only using the social media as an amplified voice to get through to my audience but it’s beyond the social media platform. I have plans probably by next year to go to various secondary schools within and outside Lagos and have programmes with them to help them set their priorities right. It’s not just about getting it right, it’s about getting it right on time. So, I’m really planning on working with secondary school students to help them get their missions here on earth, inspire them and as well help them unveil their capabilities and the greatness in them. That’s the platform I’m currently working on and I see it as a means of expanding my reach, my Get It Right With Shittu (GIRWS). Do you have mentors?  Mentors...yeah. I have mentors but I would rather say I have role models. A mentor is someone who you meet to discuss issues of life. He tends to encourage you and then tutor you on how to do things but a role model could be someone who you choose to follow his lifestyle but might not meet in person. Though I have a mentor, two actually: my elder brother and a barrister. Just two mentors, why is that? Based on what I do, it’s only those who can relate with what I do and fit into the picture that can mentor me because I can’t go to someone who doesn’t understand what I do or understand how to change people’s lives. It’s only those who have the understanding of what I do, who are in the line, see the big picture and even see the need for it. Those are the people I can talk to. How would you describe the acceptance of GIRWS so far? Well, the acceptance has been quite encouraging. I think what matters most is one’s message...what you have to offer. As time goes on, of course I would get paid for this. It’s just a chronological arrangement. But I believe the acceptance has been okay, it’s been fair enough because the message makes the difference, you understand? The message is the real deal, it makes the difference and it’s brought me this far. You mean the message of transformation and self-discovery? Yeah...yeah What practical ways do you employ in promoting this GIRWS brand? People do say first impression lasts longer. The first thing I do is to look for something that is a challenge to them in their career, their skills or anything that catches their fancy. I try to enlighten them on it, motivate them on those challenging areas then they see the need for it. I also promote myself on the social media because I have a large audience right there. Hopefully soon, I’ll be having a radio programme which would be another medium to reach another section of people. So, in January 2018, I’ll be starting with LASU Radio 95.7 fm. From the way you sound, would it be out of place to call you a preacher? I would not call myself a preacher, I would say I’m a teacher.The difference in both is the spirituality attached to one. Some people will say I’m a preacher...well, I think I’m blessed though. The difference between me preaching and me motivating is that preaching is Biblical or religious. We talk about Biblical stories, Jesus Christ and the rest but motivation is just eerr... bringing people out of their mindsets--the mindsets of it’s- not-possible, the mindsets of I-can’t-do-this and all that. So, it’s basically about career and success in life in general. So, do you do one-on-one coaching? Well, it depends. Next year January, for instance, we’re organizing an orientation for freshers in my department and I’ll be part of the crew or speakers that will be addressing them. Then, I’ll be having private conversations with some of my course mates who have been seeing my posts. They eventually come to me themselves to talk about my posts, what I do and some enlightenment on it. And each time they do, I always make sure they go home with one word, something they can always remember me for. How do you get the quotes: do you get them from other speakers and authors or they are 100% your creations? Like I said earlier, I believe it’s in my DNA. Most of the inspirational quotes I dish out come to me naturally, I believe it’s a gift from God. Secondly,what has been helping me is because I listen to tapes of Anthony Robbins and Eric Thomas. Those are my role models. Their messages inspire me and broaden my knowledge. And that helps my inspiration because when my mind is broad, there is an easy flow of ideas, of insights just like that. So, that’s how I get my quotes. I study too. I read a lot of motivational books, inspirational books, transformational books that’s just it. So, let’s talk about girls. What’s up with you and girls? (Laughs)…I don’t have anything to do with girls presently. As a matter of fact, for about a year now, I’ve not had any thing to do with any girl even though I used to. I don’t have anyone coming around for now. Are saying your exposure or fame, as it were, isn’t attracting any girl to you? Not really...I would just say that I have been able to draw a big line between my career and my social life. I used to have that problem because I had not discovered myself, what I was made for but the moment I knew I was going to be a mentor, a life coach that would help people discover their true identities and the big picture, there was a clear cut demarcation between both. Another thing is that I think I’m very futuristic. I analyze my needs before I jump into anything. It’s not wrong for me to have a girlfriend but I analyze it and think of what to benefit from it then I see it makes no much sense. So, for now, I intend to be without one because the one I had in the past, there was no plus. So, I just focus on my pursuit and when that time comes, it’ll work well. What about friends? Well, I don’t have friends like that, I don’t keep many friends. I think it’s got to do with my growing up. I grew up in an environment where my siblings and I were not allowed to really mix with kids our age(s). So, I just have two: one in church, one in school and we all are busy. We don’t really have too much time to talk about frivolities but we are close. Where do you see yourself in the next five years? First of all, let me say the first motivation for my starting the GIRWS was the vision I saw on saw on a fateful day. It wasn’t a picture I created for myself. I would rather say the Holy Spirit revealed it. While in school, I was in my room that had nothing except a wrapper that I spread on the floor and I was listening to a motivational tape then this big picture came. It was me seeing myself in the midst of a large crowd...different race, different people from Africa, Asia and other parts of the world and they were all screaming, shouting and I saw myself on the podium and they were all shouting, waiting to hear from me. And that is my aim. It’s when I get there that I would say I have achieved. That’s what birthed this inspirational stuff. It was before I even started stirring the gift. So,in the next few years, I see myself becoming a national icon.

Actor, producer, Oreofe Williams: ‘I hate being tagged a Christian filmmaker’

Since the days of yore, the evolvement and ascendancy of modernity cannot be quantified neither can it be over-emphasized. From culture, language, education to...

‘I started Ake Arts Festival for transcultural creatives dialogue’, Lola Shoneyin

This interview first appeared in Guardian Life, the weekend publication of The Guardian newspaper. It is only reproduced here for the reading pleasure of our audience.   There are three types of people in life – the thinkers, the doers, and those who excel at both. Lola Shoneyin easily falls into the third category. Shoneyin, who describes herself as “passionate, feisty, expressive, loving and honest”, won the Pen Award in America as well as the Ken Saro-Wiwa Award for prose in Nigeria. She was also on the long list for the Orange Prize in the UK for her debut novel The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives in 2010.   Speaking on her critically acclaimed novel, she says that the main inspiration was a story told to her by her brother’s girlfriend when she was 14 years old. “She told me about this particular situation, where a man had dragged his youngest wife – he was an Igbo man and he had three wives – to the hospital, complaining that she was barren and of course, as part of the medical investigation he had to undergo a series of tests as did his wives and what they found out devastated the whole family.” Her personal experiences are also reflected in the book. “On the other hand, both my grandfathers were polygamous, so I always thought that it was very interesting how that played out in the lives of my parents, especially my mother, whose mother was the first wife and therefore just really unhappy about the notion of polygamy. I just wanted to write that story and look at how our perceptions are changing as Nigerians, as Africans. How we view polygamy, for instance, vis-à-vis culture, modernity, that’s it.” The most important thing about writing the novel for her was, “the humanity, how a family deals with really serious, life-shattering challenges.”   From her time as a teacher in the UK and in Nigeria, she has led a life inspired by impacting knowledge, encouraging critical thinking, and building self-identity. One of her most successful ventures, Ake Arts and Book Festival, was inspired by the need to have African creatives dialogue and engage the African audience, and the urgent need to provide a viable platform for this to happen. “I’m a writer and I often go abroad to different festivals. I am also invited to contribute to panel discussions, to talk about my experience as a novelist…I find myself in a position where people are asking me about Nigeria, people are asking me about Africa, people are asking me about culture. And a lot of the time, I am often quite defensive. If I am in front of a crowd that is often not African, I don’t want to portray my people in a negative light.” For her, the question then became, “How do I organise a festival in Nigeria, on African soil, where I will have black African creatives in dialogue with other creatives from other parts of Africa and together, they are engaging African audiences?”   Since its inception, the festival has been able to connect more young people to African literature by de-emphasising profit-making. “There are a lot of young people who save money every month to come to Ake to buy their books for the year because we sell our books at discount prices. We are a charity and profit just doesn’t come into the equation for us. It’s about how and what can we do to get books into people’s hands, so I think that’s wonderful.” Ake Festival is not limited to building the bridge between African literary books and those interested readers. Festival-goers are able to meet some outstanding authors from Africa and the Diaspora, who are able to inspire them. “A lot of people having come to Ake Festival, having come in contact with the incredible number of writers, artist and filmmakers that we invite, feel empowered to go and pursue their dreams.” Ake Festival, she says, has impacted on the economy of Abeokuta, the Ogun State capital where it is held annually. “Ake Festival does amazing things for Abeokuta. If you are trying to get a hotel in Abeokuta at this time, it’s always rather complicated because all the rooms are fully booked. The fact that we are here, is having a wonderful effect and enriching impact on the environment.”   The impact is also reflected in an ecosystem of art and literary lovers as she says. “We had over 320 applications for volunteers from all over the country and continent. And that is incredible when people are actually looking at the arts and looking at it as something that is important enough to want to be a part of it, and that really just warms my heart.” Running a festival of that size and reach can be a daunting task, especially in a country with a low appreciation for literacy and arts. How does Shoneyin attract the number of people who travel to the ancient city of Abeokuta just for the festival? We are “constantly looking at ways to reinvent ourselves; constantly looking at opportunities for improvement but the biggest and the most beautiful thing is the demographics of the people that we engage and the fact that it keeps getting younger.” Sharing another factor that has challenged the status quo, she says, “our panel discussions are so lively and stimulating, we have highly intelligent people sitting down, talking about issues fearlessly because we have created a safe space and that’s really important.” Regardless of all the positives, Shoneyin wishes Abeokuta residents would show more interest in the festival that happens right under their nose. Most of the participants at the festivals come from places like Lagos, Abuja and even from outside Nigeria.   From her debut novel which discusses polygamy in Nigeria, to her work with the festival, to Book Buzz Foundation, and most recently Ouidah Books, Shoneyin is a woman who is set in defining the standards for literacy in Nigeria. She says her driving force has “always been to create.” “I love bringing people together and I love seeing them enjoying themselves and also engaging their minds. I think that is so powerful because sometimes I feel like, in Nigeria, if your parents aren’t telling you what direction to go to, it is the religious institution that you belong to (that’s doing so).” Shoneyin’s ventures are all aimed at improving critical thinking, the formation of informed opinions and starting discourse. She explains, “When you come to an event like this and you are listening to two different points of view, even though you’re not contributing verbally, your mind is dancing from one side to the other…I think it’s a really powerful thing because we’ve got to do what we can as a country to encourage critical thinking and to just get people to be able to reason and take their own decisions.” Speaking of being a feminist in Nigeria, Shoneyin reveals, that she sees herself “as a feminist (even) before it became fashionable in Nigeria.” She believes that feminism in the country is about two things – opportunity and choice. “Opportunities that are available to men, have to be available to women. I feel we do a great disservice as a country by not letting women flourish, by not giving them the opportunity to do what they want to do; I think we suffer, we are less productive, we are less powerful or empowered economically. It’s about choice as well; when you’re an adult, it’s about ‘what do I really want to do?’ not ‘what does society want me to do?’ not ‘what do my parents want me to do?’ and not ‘what does my husband want me to do?’”   She goes on to say, “Being able to choose is very important; being able to be economically empowered is very important and independent; being able to say, ‘I want to be a politician’ and be able to go for it and not need to compromise yourself in any way, is very important.” Shoneyin is also very passionate about people having and developing ideas. She says, “Just make people have ideas, make them want to develop their ideas. Make them feel empowered to have ideas… When you read a book, it makes you think; when you listen to an interesting conversation, you form your own opinion and you develop your own ideas. For me, that’s what it’s all about. I have seen how you can function in a situation where you are not encouraged to use your brain. I have seen what the consequences are for children. The potential is there but you are not doing anything to set it free and to let it grow. There is too much of that going on in our society, so all these things are like providing a counter-narrative and that’s how I see it. If there was more space for people to think, do things and create, I just feel we would all be happier.” If there is any preconceived societal notion she will like to eradicate, it is the notion that “there are certain things in this life that you cannot do and I think that is what books teach us through those characters”.   Shoneyin is always creating, her mind is always buzzing and new projects are on her mind like a task on her to-do list. Potential collaborators are not in short supply. Source:Guardian Life “I had a magical conversation with a bank today who wants us to organise a festival in Lagos. We are also working on the right-to-write project; we are working with Adamawa, Kaduna, Borno, Katsina and Bauchi state and it involves training twenty writers from Northern Nigeria and five illustrators, and the idea is to train them over a period of 18 months and they complete a manuscript. “We are also training young people in the universities in media, how to use the media safely and how to tell their own stories using film clips and photographs. We are working in partnership with Africultures which is an organisation in France, and it’s something we are very excited about doing over the next few months, and (there are also) lots of collaborations with the Edinburgh festival.” Towards the end of the interview, Shoneyin reveals her true essence – being creative is not a choice. It is a must. It is what makes tick. “There are lots of inspiring things coming up and that’s how I like to live my life. I need to be inspired on a daily basis, boredom is unhealthy for me,” she concludes.   Source: The Guardian Newspaper

‘My muse flows when I’m free from sins’, Fr33zinPaul, Spoken Word Artiste

  Until recently, no one knew new literary genres like flash fiction and spoken word poetry would be added to the ones that have been...

‘I Don’t Experience Writer’s Block’, Prof Akachi Ezeigbo

The first time I spoke with Prof Akachi Ezeigbo, one of Nigeria's and Africa's finest writers, on booking an appointment with her, she sounded...

‘Poetry has taken me round the world’ Two-time BBc Award winner, Folu Agoi

Nigeria's first generation writings witnessed the emergence of a handful of writers who had acquired a good education and possessed skills in varying...

‘Nigerian Directors Don’t Shy Away from Action Movies’, Obioma Opara, President/Founder Eko International Film...

Film making began on the premises of stage plays in the 1890s. During this period, films were under a minute long because of technological...

‘The society will always be at the epicentre of my writings’, Eriata Oribhabor

It's a common phenomenon for people to do things for different reasons. That one reason that works wonders for 'A' may be the why...

‘Your dreams determine how far you go after school’,Professor Bode Sowande

It was such a cozy afternoon in the city of Ibadan on the day slated for showcasing the miscellany of arts, talent and intellect...

Trending

We Have Moved Office!!!!

You can now experience better and faster surfing of our content on our newly built and improved platform www.theinspiredlitmag.com.ng

Prophecies Are Not For Mundane Minds

  By Yusuf Balogun Gemini Growing up as a kid, the only thing that kept my head on after a terrible day in school was the...

A Secret Rendezvous

By Anonymous Wrapped in a dirty white towel, the man stood by the broken north facing window and gave a passing look over the foggy...

Click to Download for FREE!!!!

You can now download the latest edition of our magazine for FREEEE!!!! Just follow this link http://theinspiredlitmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Edition-003-compressed.pdf to savour everything that has been beautifully packaged...

‘Poetry enjoys more social favours than drama’ Prof Ahmed Yerima

    With his first and last name, what might probably pop-up in one's mind is a figure who has ruled the political atmosphere of Zamfara...

Heartstrings, Episode 6

By Mr Ben “You are a nice person. Don’t let them take you for granted.” He halted at his door and faced them, “Thank you for your concern. Have a good night ladies.” “Good night doctor,” they sighed heavily and returned to their flat. Chinyere looked him up and down, folded her arms across her chest and stood in front of him like a stumbling block. “Chinyere, Chinyere, Chinyere!” he waved a pointed finger at her. She pursed her lips, “I am only looking out for you.” “Who made you my guardian angel or my bodyguard?” his tone of voice rose a notch. She grimaced. She didn’t like the fact that he didn’t appreciate her gesture of care. He looked up at her, “I am old enough to be your father.” “You are not my father,” she hissed and stepped backwards. He heaved a sigh of distress, “Regardless… look young woman; I know you like me…” She lowered her gaze. She had fallen for him since he moved into the compound but, he had always related with her like a child. She had hoped that he would see her like a grown woman and learn to love her the way she loved him. “Look… you are a good girl… but, I cannot go out with you,” he searched her pale face. She bit at her lower lip. His words wounded her pining heart. “I am not a pedophile,” he hoped he would be able to get through to her that night. She looked into his honey coloured eyes, “I know that. It doesn’t matter what people might think… it is ‘you’ and ‘me’ that matters,” her eyes pleaded for understanding. He raised his head and looked upwards. Why do teenagers have such thick skulls? Nothing ever got through to them. Lord Jesus help me out here. She is not listening to me. “Listen to me,” he gave her a long steady look, “I don’t love you, I cannot love you and I will never ever love you the way you want me to.” Colour drained from her face. Wet dark eyes probed honey coloured firm ones. She gulped spittle, turned around and fled. “Chinyere!” he took some steps forward, and then exhaled loudly. He ran his fingers through his brown cropped curly hair and stifled a yawn. He backed up and pressed the door bell. He saw Misi standing at the doorway clad in a knee length straight brown dress with a pink bow at the waist line. The colour blended with her chocolate brown skin, making her look fresh, clean and desirable. Her dark brown shoulder length hair was curled at the tip, giving her a stylish look. “Welcome…” she felt uncomfortable under his gentle scrutiny. There was a gleam in his honey coloured eyes as he stared at her. “Evening, how are you doing?” he stepped into the apartment. “Fine,” she closed the door and followed him into the sitting room. “Evening everyone,” he met his sister and the Philips watching the television. “Welcome,” Eno winked at him. “Evening doctor,” Mr. and Mrs. Philips greeted him. “I hope there is food in this house,” he directed his gaze at his sister. “Yes, I will set the dining,” Misi responded. “Good, thanks,”he glanced at her and headed for his bedroom. She hurried into the kitchen and brought out his bowl of ogbonna soup and a plate of semovita out of the microwave. She and Eno had made soup and stew that evening. She set it on a tray and carried it to the dining. She returned to the kitchen and brought out a pack of fruit juice from the refrigerator and picked a clean glass cup in the cupboard. She arranged it on the dining and dashed back to the kitchen. She filled an empty plastic bowl with water and reached out for one of the napkins hanging on the window. She took it to the dining table and joined Eno on the settee. She and Eno had hit it off that day. She found out that she worked at Wazobia radio station and coincidentally, they needed an accountant. Eno called her boss that noon and an interview date was scheduled for her. She believed that she would get the job. God had turned things around for her family and everything was working out for their good. She noticed when the doctor started eating. He was in his boxers and a white singlet. His fair skin made him to look like a half-caste. She wondered if his curly hair was natural or in perm. There were times when she was tempted to run her fingers through it. How will it feel like? She cleared her head. It wouldn’t be wise to develop feelings for someone that had decided to help her family with no strings attached. Relationship was the last thing on her mind anyway. Her last boyfriend had broken up with her when he got an opportunity to travel out of the country. He didn’t want a long distance relationship and he wasn’t ready to get married. Her family situation had also killed any desire to get involve with someone else. She might be ready to date again once they were back on their feet. She saw him leave the room. He must have finished eating. She got up and walked to the dining. She cleared the table and carried the empty dishes into the kitchen. xxxxxx Eno left everyone in the sitting room and went to one of the guest rooms to sleep. She had told Misi to be ready early the next morning so that she could be interviewed by her boss and hopefully gain employment at the Radio Station. She liked the girl, despite her family’s financial condition; there was still an air of affluence about her. She had a calm and peaceful aura. It had been a while since she had met someone who was so full of gratitude and had a firm faith in God. If she was in her shoes, she wasn’t sure how she would have reacted or coped. The Philips had stood the test of time. They were an encouragement to all that God never failed. Misi came in and joined her on the bed. Her parents and the doctor were still in the sitting room watching the news. She needed to wake up early the next day. She couldn’t afford to sleep late and risk waking up late in the morning. In a minute or two, they were both fast asleep. Bassey called Tomisin aside and they spoke in low tones. His wife discerned that they wanted privacy. She bid them good night and left the room. “I have secured an accommodation for you and your family.” Tomisin gaped in surprise. He prayed within that God would bless the young man. The Lord had used a perfect stranger to rescue them when friends and family turned their backs on them. “It is a two bedroom apartment right here in Ikeja.” He clasped his hands together, “Thank you, thank you so much.” “You are welcome sir.” “God will bless you,” his eyes glistered with tears. “Amen. My parents and siblings donated furniture, electronics, kitchen utensils, food stuff, provisions, and a host of other things.” “Wow!” his excited gaze held the younger man’s happy ones. “You can move in tomorrow if you like.” “That is good news, thank you so much.” “I am happy to be used by the Lord to help you and your family… just thank God.” He nodded in appreciation. He couldn’t stop the tears from flowing. His heart expanded with joy, “God will bless you and your family beyond your wildest dreams.” “Amen! Amen…” Tomisin looked heavenwards, “Thank you so much Jesus. Oh God thank you.” Bassey excused himself and went into his room. He would speak to his parents about how they could integrate Mr. and Mrs. Philips in their work force. They had an outlet in Ikeja. The couple could work there and spend less on transportation. His brother had not given him feedback concerning vacancy in his place of work. He needed to get Misi a good job too. He had an accountant already in his clinic. If not, he would have employed her. He lay on the bed and soon drifted off to sleep. His dreams were completely taken over by the Philips’ daughter. She was singing and dancing. ******************************************** Stay connected for another fresh episode, click on our ads and follow us on facebook, twitter and instagram.

CupidsRisk, Episode 33

Dabaru! His nightmare was back ....by Aedeeaee “Shit,” Chinedu said when the converstion with Habib ended. If his hands were not on the steering wheel,...

Nigerian Writer,Teju Cole Begins Nationwide Tour in the U.S

Nigerian writer and one time Germany's International Literary Prize winner, Teju Cole has concluded plans to begin a nationwide tour in the U.S and...