Lagidigba

Author: Yusuf Balogun Gemini Reviewer: Yamilenu Bamgboye Genre: Spoken word Release Date: February 14, 2018    *****************************  Click to download the audio ******************************* In an article published in The Guardian Newspaper on Saturday April 5, 2009 by Alloysius Nduka Duru titled Waist Bead among the Yoruba, it’s documented that ‘The Yorubas  have developed the most varying and peculiar uses for the waist beads...that cuts  across both material and spiritual aspects of the life of the people.… They also have the capacity to produce the beads for varying purposes ranging from royalty, body adornment, deification and decoration’. Ileke is the general name for all types of beads in Yoruba but the ones designed to be worn on the waists are called lagidigba. Lagidigba is made of big, thick and massive palm nut shells strung together and it usually includes bebe--- a pebble-like attachment at the centre. The etymology of the word ‘lagidigba’ dates back to ancient times when maidens and wives adorned their waists with it. While some did for chastity and its erotic appeal or power to provoke strong emotional desires or response from the menfolk, others did to control conception, ward off Abiku and prevent spiritual attacks. As a writer who isn’t oblivious of the abrasion of our local languages and Yoruba in particular among youth his age, one thing Gemini does is to deliberately explore the intricacies of the (Yoruba) culture with accurate application of proverbs, idioms, ancient tales and rhymes. The antecedent of this passion which began a long time ago with heavy importations and code-mixing between Yoruba and English in some of his poems like Eba-Odan, Abobaku, Magun, Totem, Moremi and Ori (apologies that the Yoruba words don’t have diacritics, I’m still practising my craft on unicodes) has prompted, from the nerves, a gargantuan tremor of a full-blown Yoruba poetry!!!! Lagidigba, as the title portends, is a romantic poem that reveals the most intense and truest profession of the love Alabi, the poet persona feels for Abebi, a maiden in his village. These emotions reach the peak when he discovers that his fancy seems to have been captured by her alluring beauty and the eroticism of the lagidigba that adorns her waist. He becomes too overwhelmed that his thoughts burst open into chants--- on sighting her from a distance--- with rather unconscious prayers of good character that match-up to the extreme outward beauty of his beloved so that what he feels for her will not evaporate like the vapour of a hot soup. This singular act asserts reality in a way--- the reality of men wishing to pitch tents with ladies that seem to have it all: beauty and good manners. And being a potential lover of this black beauty, he doesn’t just delight so much in wooing her (Abebi) or using edifying words to describe how beautifully and wonderfully God (Eledumare) has made her or how he will never trade her for anything in this world, he also takes ‘extreme’ pride in calling himself her husband and relishes in self love with oriki: Emi n’Alabi oko Abeeebi Omo o kan ilekun ko ni ile ja Ajo u yo koko le nu Emi l’omo aje le ti ko je ki to de pani Awa ni iku lodo Omo a to ku je un Omo a taaa ye so ro Oku ta gbe de oja ti o ta L’omo araye da so fun to pe l’egun Ogogo omo ba ku l’oyo o le jo Ba ku loko ni n daa pon Omo oku eko ijo lo akara Apart from the romance we see between the characters: Alabi and Abebi, we also see romance extend to a display of ‘Negritudinal’ features which exhume the deepest attachments Gemini has for his roots by using verisimilitude to draw comparisons between nature, abstract ideas and events of years past to lift the imaginations of his listeners and shape their perception about the richness of Yoruba culture. As defined by one of its champions, Leopold Sedar Senghor, in an article that was first published in 1973, titled The Concept of Negritude in the Poetry of Leopold Sedar Senghor, by Sylvia Washington Ba, Negritude is ‘the sum of the cultural values of the black world as they are expressed in the life, the institutions, and the works of black men’: Abeebi, Iwo omo pe ko si iyi f’aja ti o le yin B’o sin ba ja, oun a si di opa Iwo o n se o ni jogbo bi ti panshaga, Abi o gbo pe oni jogbo ni n sin ilu, ilu o sin onijogbo Won ni ka to ri erin o di gbo Ka to ri afon, o d’odon Emi wa ti ri Abeebi, emi mo tun wa re gbo Lojo t’opo ye ni ile jogbo, Gbogbo aye n de be lo ki won Ikele ni kan lo ku ti o lo ki won Ikele ojo na l’Abebi Ewo osa, aso pupa ibo ku de sa re, Ewo osa, mundia ati wo re poli Ko ro so soke, ko wewu so ri Oun re gboyan ki ri Ojo na l’esu gbe lo yan lo fi sa ya. And being a master at his craft, he uses hypophora to lessen the burden sheer rhetorical questions would have placed on his listeners by providing answers to his own questions: anaphora, refrain (repetition), contractions and different tone marks (sorry if you don’t see them) like ‘…ijakan ijakan...’, ‘Ewo osa...’, ‘Ibaadi aran yo lo ke re o gun rege...’, ‘Alabebi ife ayomi janto...’, ‘b’abata se kere kere dodo, B’omi lo t’ao r’ese omi, b’okunkun t’ao r’ese okunkun...’and ‘Jankulobo’ to achieve special effects just like it’s done in English. He also employs the language of persuasion heightened by enjambment, blank verse and metaphorical expressions to sustain his muse: ‘Ikele ojo na l’Abebi...’ ‘Iwo la sin to araba tin be larin orofo Afinju eye tin je ngbangba bi oba...’ ‘Iwo o n se o ni jogbo bi ti panshaga...’ Most times, when poets themselves are characters in their own poems, they maintain a pattern of identity which their readers flow along with but here in Lagidigba, Gemini chooses to add a twist to his by switching from his ficticious name-- Alabi-- to his real name--- Yusuf Balogun Gemini and gives it so much coloration that leads his listeners to his hometown, his genealogy and one cannot but wonder if it all begins and ends with his place of birth: B’oba ni tani n soro, Emi l’omo olalomi, Emi iyero okin omo lofa mo so Ab’isu j’oruko, ijakadi l’oloun t’ofa IJakan ijakan ti won ja lofa lojosi Osoju gboro ninu oko Osujo ebe oun ala Iba soju oloko iba la won Emi lomo lanre bu re Ikan ogbodo ju kan Bi kan ba ju kan ni le olofa mojo Ogun ni n da si’le baba won   Ofa ooo, aye’le Ofa Iye ro okin omo abi lofa ni’le Olalomi Olalomi omo abi l’Ofa ni lu alomo Dunku dunku se re geru geru loriki alomo Ofa ooo, aiye’le Ofa Bi mo ba w’aye ni’gba egbeje, Mba wa ni’gba egbefa, Olalomi baba mi ni o tun mi bi Iyero okin baba mi ni o tun mi bi Emi ni Yusuf omo Balogun t’oun pe ni Gemini You definitely will agree with me at this juncture that the in-depth understanding of one’s style and the unconscious, I mean unconscious application of the techniques that make poetry really enjoyable conjugate, most times, the bespoke of a writer. Of a truth, one can boldly say that Gemini, in his nature, usually casts a spell of beautiful words on his audience to demystify the complexities of compression by extensively using the imagery of relative instances to appeal to emotions and project thought-provoking ideas into his audience thereby swaying their attention from the beginning to the end. Click to download the audio ********************** Below is the transcription **************   Ibaadi aran yo lo ke re o gun rege Kori inu egbin ko ma ba to de je Edumare jo’ jogun iwa fun Ibaadi aran yo lo ke re o gun rege Alabebi ife ayomi janto Alabebi ife ayo mi gun re ge Kori inu re o ma ma ba to de je Ko le ri nu bi sun bi wa le   Alabebi ife ayomi janto Abebi mi owon Okin ni o omo lo ja eye M o wo gbo titi ko si eye bi okin Eledua oba lo da labalaba wi pe ko ma fododo se bugbe O hun Eledua lo to ri enu se eso owo Ohun Eledua lo fi ikarahun se ile igbin Be igbin mi o ni rajo la yi mu ikarahun e lowo Ase da o ma ma se o To gbon omi ife owuro si inu koko bi yinyin   Abeeebi, Ako aja lo la, abo ara ni ile osupa Aya bi ileke, aya bi’de Ori re ni n daa de owo, Orun re ni n se gida ileke Aya eni o se di be be re ka fi ileke si di aya elomiran Emi n’Alabi oko Abeeebi Omo o kan ilekun ko ni ile ja Ajo u yo koko le nu Emi l’omo aje le ti ko je ki to de pani Awa ni iku lodo Omo a to ku je un Omo a taaa ye so ro Oku ta gbe de oja ti o ta L’omo araye da so fun to pe l’egun Ogogo omo ba ku l’oyo o le jo Ba ku loko ni n daa pon Omo oku eko ijo lo akara   Abeebi, Eye po lo ko ka to f’okin joba Sebi’ka la’fo’ka si, a si ma fi lagidigba si bebedi Bo mo alakowe ba’fo’ka s’owo, Emi asi ku ba Abeebi to fi ileke si bebe lo. Ileke Abeebi lowo mi kan leni n wa re le oba Iwo la sin to araba tin be larin orofo Afinju eye tin je ngbangba bi oba B’o ti e l’owo eyo no bi ti panshaga, To si ni ara alaranbara bi ti panshaga, Mo se bi kokoro alate ti re to un tate ni   Abeebi, Iwo omo pe ko si iyi f’aja ti o le yin B’o sin ba ja, oun a si di opa Iwo o n se o ni jogbo bi ti panshaga, Abi o gbo pe oni jogbo ni n sin ilu, ilu o sin onijogbo Won ni ka to ri erin o di gbo Ka to ri afon, o d’odon Emi wa ti ri Abeebi, emi mo tun wa re gbo Lojo t’opo ye ni ile jogbo, Gbogbo aye n de be lo ki won Ikele ni kan lo ku ti o lo ki won Ikele ojo na l’Abebi Ewo osa, aso pupa ibo ku de sa re, Ewo osa, mundia ati wo re poli Ko ro so soke, ko wewu so ri Oun re gboyan ki ri Ojo na l’esu gbe lo yan lo fi sa ya.   Abeebi, Agogo ni baba re, gboro ki f’omo re b’ikete Bi na ba se were gun le, b’abata se kere kere dodo B’omi lo t’ao r’ese omi, b’okunkun t’ao r’ese okunkun Bin b’ati ri Abeebi me, abu se bu se K’ni iyi obirin to le wa ti o ni wa? K’ni iyi aja ti o lerigi? K’i ni iyi koko to ti run ni’sale? Se bi eja ki bi nu omi ko rin ni’le? Akerengbe ogbodo b’inu oguro Iran igbin o le gba gbe ikarahun Iran oni sango o je gba gbe bata Emi Alabi o je gba gbe Abebi. Sun mo mi, ka we ninu agbalagbalubu ife B’ariwa o gbodo se bo, ipako ogbo suti B’o hun elewon ko si mi agabja Egungun ti wa fe jo, alaso t’wa fe woran Ojo esin fe ro, eja awo eni ti o ka wo mori gbeyin Jankulubo ileke ja t’owu t’owu Jankulubo...   B’oba ni tani n soro, Emi l’omo olalomi, Emi iyero okin omo lofa mo so Ab’isu j’oruko, ijakadi l’oloun t’ofa IJakan ijakan ti won ja lofa lojosi Osoju gboro ninu oko Osujo ebe oun ala Iba soju oloko iba la won Emi lomo lanre bu re Ikan ogbodo ju kan Bi kan ba ju kan ni le olofa mojo Ogun ni n da si’le baba won   Ofa ooo, aye’le Ofa Iye ro okin omo abi lofa ni’le Olalomi Olalomi omo abi l’Ofa ni lu alomo Dunku dunku se re geru geru loriki alomo Ofa ooo, aiye’le Ofa Mba wa ni’gba egbefa, Olalomi baba mi ni o tun mi bi Iyero okin baba mi ni o tun mi bi Emi ni Yusuf omo Balogun t’oun pe ni Gemini  

Everything around us that we call life was made by people just like you. So, build a life don't live one.

Powered by : Get It Right With Shittu

Click to get more motivational quotes

Trending

Heartstrings, Episode 6

By Mr Ben “You are a nice person. Don’t let them take you for granted.” He halted at his door and faced them, “Thank you for your concern. Have a good night ladies.” “Good night doctor,” they sighed heavily and returned to their flat. Chinyere looked him up and down, folded her arms across her chest and stood in front of him like a stumbling block. “Chinyere, Chinyere, Chinyere!” he waved a pointed finger at her. She pursed her lips, “I am only looking out for you.” “Who made you my guardian angel or my bodyguard?” his tone of voice rose a notch. She grimaced. She didn’t like the fact that he didn’t appreciate her gesture of care. He looked up at her, “I am old enough to be your father.” “You are not my father,” she hissed and stepped backwards. He heaved a sigh of distress, “Regardless… look young woman; I know you like me…” She lowered her gaze. She had fallen for him since he moved into the compound but, he had always related with her like a child. She had hoped that he would see her like a grown woman and learn to love her the way she loved him. “Look… you are a good girl… but, I cannot go out with you,” he searched her pale face. She bit at her lower lip. His words wounded her pining heart. “I am not a pedophile,” he hoped he would be able to get through to her that night. She looked into his honey coloured eyes, “I know that. It doesn’t matter what people might think… it is ‘you’ and ‘me’ that matters,” her eyes pleaded for understanding. He raised his head and looked upwards. Why do teenagers have such thick skulls? Nothing ever got through to them. Lord Jesus help me out here. She is not listening to me. “Listen to me,” he gave her a long steady look, “I don’t love you, I cannot love you and I will never ever love you the way you want me to.” Colour drained from her face. Wet dark eyes probed honey coloured firm ones. She gulped spittle, turned around and fled. “Chinyere!” he took some steps forward, and then exhaled loudly. He ran his fingers through his brown cropped curly hair and stifled a yawn. He backed up and pressed the door bell. He saw Misi standing at the doorway clad in a knee length straight brown dress with a pink bow at the waist line. The colour blended with her chocolate brown skin, making her look fresh, clean and desirable. Her dark brown shoulder length hair was curled at the tip, giving her a stylish look. “Welcome…” she felt uncomfortable under his gentle scrutiny. There was a gleam in his honey coloured eyes as he stared at her. “Evening, how are you doing?” he stepped into the apartment. “Fine,” she closed the door and followed him into the sitting room. “Evening everyone,” he met his sister and the Philips watching the television. “Welcome,” Eno winked at him. “Evening doctor,” Mr. and Mrs. Philips greeted him. “I hope there is food in this house,” he directed his gaze at his sister. “Yes, I will set the dining,” Misi responded. “Good, thanks,”he glanced at her and headed for his bedroom. She hurried into the kitchen and brought out his bowl of ogbonna soup and a plate of semovita out of the microwave. She and Eno had made soup and stew that evening. She set it on a tray and carried it to the dining. She returned to the kitchen and brought out a pack of fruit juice from the refrigerator and picked a clean glass cup in the cupboard. She arranged it on the dining and dashed back to the kitchen. She filled an empty plastic bowl with water and reached out for one of the napkins hanging on the window. She took it to the dining table and joined Eno on the settee. She and Eno had hit it off that day. She found out that she worked at Wazobia radio station and coincidentally, they needed an accountant. Eno called her boss that noon and an interview date was scheduled for her. She believed that she would get the job. God had turned things around for her family and everything was working out for their good. She noticed when the doctor started eating. He was in his boxers and a white singlet. His fair skin made him to look like a half-caste. She wondered if his curly hair was natural or in perm. There were times when she was tempted to run her fingers through it. How will it feel like? She cleared her head. It wouldn’t be wise to develop feelings for someone that had decided to help her family with no strings attached. Relationship was the last thing on her mind anyway. Her last boyfriend had broken up with her when he got an opportunity to travel out of the country. He didn’t want a long distance relationship and he wasn’t ready to get married. Her family situation had also killed any desire to get involve with someone else. She might be ready to date again once they were back on their feet. She saw him leave the room. He must have finished eating. She got up and walked to the dining. She cleared the table and carried the empty dishes into the kitchen. xxxxxx Eno left everyone in the sitting room and went to one of the guest rooms to sleep. She had told Misi to be ready early the next morning so that she could be interviewed by her boss and hopefully gain employment at the Radio Station. She liked the girl, despite her family’s financial condition; there was still an air of affluence about her. She had a calm and peaceful aura. It had been a while since she had met someone who was so full of gratitude and had a firm faith in God. If she was in her shoes, she wasn’t sure how she would have reacted or coped. The Philips had stood the test of time. They were an encouragement to all that God never failed. Misi came in and joined her on the bed. Her parents and the doctor were still in the sitting room watching the news. She needed to wake up early the next day. She couldn’t afford to sleep late and risk waking up late in the morning. In a minute or two, they were both fast asleep. Bassey called Tomisin aside and they spoke in low tones. His wife discerned that they wanted privacy. She bid them good night and left the room. “I have secured an accommodation for you and your family.” Tomisin gaped in surprise. He prayed within that God would bless the young man. The Lord had used a perfect stranger to rescue them when friends and family turned their backs on them. “It is a two bedroom apartment right here in Ikeja.” He clasped his hands together, “Thank you, thank you so much.” “You are welcome sir.” “God will bless you,” his eyes glistered with tears. “Amen. My parents and siblings donated furniture, electronics, kitchen utensils, food stuff, provisions, and a host of other things.” “Wow!” his excited gaze held the younger man’s happy ones. “You can move in tomorrow if you like.” “That is good news, thank you so much.” “I am happy to be used by the Lord to help you and your family… just thank God.” He nodded in appreciation. He couldn’t stop the tears from flowing. His heart expanded with joy, “God will bless you and your family beyond your wildest dreams.” “Amen! Amen…” Tomisin looked heavenwards, “Thank you so much Jesus. Oh God thank you.” Bassey excused himself and went into his room. He would speak to his parents about how they could integrate Mr. and Mrs. Philips in their work force. They had an outlet in Ikeja. The couple could work there and spend less on transportation. His brother had not given him feedback concerning vacancy in his place of work. He needed to get Misi a good job too. He had an accountant already in his clinic. If not, he would have employed her. He lay on the bed and soon drifted off to sleep. His dreams were completely taken over by the Philips’ daughter. She was singing and dancing. ******************************************** Stay connected for another fresh episode, click on our ads and follow us on facebook, twitter and instagram.

CupidsRisk, Episode 33

Dabaru! His nightmare was back ....by Aedeeaee “Shit,” Chinedu said when the converstion with Habib ended. If his hands were not on the steering wheel,...

Nigerian Writer,Teju Cole Begins Nationwide Tour in the U.S

Nigerian writer and one time Germany's International Literary Prize winner, Teju Cole has concluded plans to begin a nationwide tour in the U.S and...

Bla Bla Bla

'Hey sweetie, when you get on stage, just introduce yourself and go ahead with your presentation, okay?'I admonished. My little nephew looked at me and...

Longing Thought

To Adedayo Adeyemi Agarau Do you remember Sade? Do you remember yesterday we flew kite at the cloudy street of Ibadan? Do you remember how I...

Gov Obaseki Celebrates Poets, Writers on World Poetry Day

The Governor of Edo State, Mr. Godwin Obaseki, has commended poets and writers for serving as the mirror of the society and amplifying beliefs,...

Agbe (Woodcock)    

                                      Reviewer: Yamilenu Bamgboye Release Date: March 15, 2018 Genre: Spoken Word Poetry Artiste: Yusuf Balogun Gemini   It’s not unusual for people in this part of the world to take so much delight in lip service and worse off, celebrate dead people who were probably their contemporaries and legends that gave their all for the advancement of one humanitarian course or the other with vain words just because. It is bad enough to see these legends toil with so much passion in their life time for the things they believe without being celebrated but, isn’t it excruciatingly painful to their loved ones when they are laced with so much hypocrisy that could even make the dead cringe and perhaps, spin in their graves? The celebration of epicals isn’t restricted to formal recognition by some organised persons or groups or being placed on some elevated platform before a multitude, nah! It involves acceptance, sincere words of appreciation and handouts of few kobo when their lives depend on it like Enebeli Elebuwa, OJB Jezreel (before Rotimi Amaechi came to his rescue), Olumide Bakare and even Dagrin (according to a reliable source). No wonder Munachi Obiekwe died without asking for help but couldn’t stop the usual hypocritical accolades at his burial. With this consciousness, Yusuf Balogun Gemini, a young scholar and a budding poet refuses to be part of the bandwagon of a bunch of hypocrites involved in such practices with the sleight of hand. Instead, he decides to document the exploits of a legend--Pa Akinwunmi Isola--for today, tomorrow and maybe, forever by mourning his exist. Until his death on February 17, 2018 in Ibadan, Oyo State after an age-related illness, he was a professor of Yoruba at the prestigious Obafemi Awolowo University and a visiting professor at the University of Georgia, U.S.A. In year 2000, in recognition of his efforts and dream of making Yoruba the language of instruction in schools, he was given the National Merit Award and the Fellow of the Nigerian Academy of Letters. His notable works before he broke into broadcasting and established his own production company that has turned a number of his subsequent plays into television drama and films include Efunsetan Aniwura, his first play in his undergraduate days at the University of Ibadan in 1961 and O leku in 1986 (Wikipedia). In 1997, Uncle TK (Tunde Kelani) of Mainframe Productions adapted the novel into a television drama or feature movie thus, giving fresh breath to the novel and unconsciously sparking off the revival of certain practices like the fashion trend of the 1970s. Agbe translated as woodcock in English is a kind of bird in the genus Scolopax of the family Scolopacidae. Simply put, it’s a brown bird with a long straight beak, short legs and a short tail, hunted for food or sport (Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary). Being a popular gamebird, the rarity of this specie is felt due to ‘overhunting’ and it is this rarity that really affords Gemini the opportunity to depict Pa Akinwunmi Isola as agbe-- that uncommon specie of legend that has been hunted by iku-- death. In this igbala whose English equivalent is dirge: a sorrowful or lament for the dead, Gemini identifies himself with the biggest dream of the icon (to see Yoruba language become the language of instruction in schools in the South-West) especially now that he has become engrossed in documenting and reviving Yoruba with poetry dipped in ancient tales, incantations, myths, adages, idioms and analogies. As customary of his poems and many Yoruba speakers that make reference to things that connect to certain metaphysical elements, he opens by paying homage to God (Edumare), the creator of all things and many lesser beings with different ranks and file in the spiritual realm: Ogun (the god of iron), Esu laalu (the Devil or Satan) and Awon Iya (the ethereal motherhood): Mo se ba Edumare, atiwaye ojo, atiwo oorun, iba kutukutu awo owuro, ganrin ganrin awo osan gangan, wirin wirin awo oru, a ti okuku su wi, awo oganjo, Iba Elewu Ide, Iba Elewu ala, Iba irawo sa sa n be lehin f'osupa, Afefelegelege - awo isalu aye, Efuufu, awo isalu Oorun, Iba Ajagunmole oluwo ode Orun, Iba Aromoganyin onibode aye oun Orun, Iba Awonamaja babalawo tii komo ni IFA oju Orun, Iba Esu laalu, Iba eyin iya mi, Afinju eye ti n je loju oloko, afinju eye ti n fiye sapa ti n fiko seyin, iba ile otete lanbua, Agbohun maa fo, abiyamo tooto, Iba Ogun, yankan bi ogbe, Iba otarigidi ti n se yeye Ogun, iba omobowu oun Ewiri maje, Iba IJA, iba osoosi ode mata, Iba Olutasin tokotoko bo Ogun, Iba ope ti a n tidi n be, tii n tori gbe ni. Aba ti alagemo ba da l'oosa n GBA, Oro ti akuwarapa ba so, ode Orun lo ti wa. In case you wonder why he has to go that way every other time, he says in his poem Ipado: the dangers of walking in an unsafe zone that discussions involving celestial powers usually have a repercussion when one shuns or undermines their terrestrial weaponry: Ore wa, ohun kekere ma ko ni ipa Amori. Oun oju agba rii loke oun lo je o so akobi omo re ni Olaniyonu. Sugbon Aja suwon deyin Agbo suwon roro Aja o ni roro Ka rele lo magbo wa bo Eegun ile baba eni. Opuro n gbin paki, Oniwayo n gbin Ila. Awon akumamoojudi eda po lo jantirere loke Epe. Gbi le n gbo, e mo ibi ti ibon ti n ro. And after his lament on the unfairness of iku-- death who hunted Pa Akinwunmi Isola at the age of 78 like a hunter would hunt agbe (woodcock), he ends with an incantation to ward him off his trail: Awon agba ti ni n pe bi mope n se pe laye, n dagba dogbo n o fi omo ewu ro ori. Iku, maa to mi wa, ota mi ni o mu lo. Won ni, Kii ma so pe, Okete bayii niwa re, o ba IFA mu le, O da IFA, Okete bayii niwa re.   Otente, a o leke won, bi igba ba wodo, a le tente, otente a o leke won. Alasuwada, parada! Ojo ti mo da ko i pe, Ewe iyeye, igba ni... If, however, this constant practice of his (incantations and paying homage to celestial powers) wants to deter you in a way from becoming a language advocate like him and many others, not too worry. Just focus on the peripheral and let your words and referents be limited to your immediate environment and the world you know. Nevertheless, Gemini has done it again and this time, it’s simply for posterity. Do well to download and enjoy Yoruba poetry at its peak. Click here to...

Hey– Another Series of Toothless Panther?

By Yusuf Balagun Gemini For quite a while, I have stopped watching Yoruba movies or Nigerian movies generally, popularly regarded as Nollywood. It's undeniable that...